Peace Corps Volunteer Emily McKeone is working with her community members and local school teachers to bring safe, clean drinking water to three schools in Zambia to improve students’ health and boost school attendance. People in the communities currently travel long distances to get water that frequently comes from unprotected sources like local streams, which often leads to water-borne illnesses and sanitation concerns at school facilities.

By constructing borehole wells, the community’s water sources will be protected from contaminants and safe to drink. The additional water supply will also support school construction projects and enable students and teachers to plant gardens and orchards. The resulting produce will help raise money to maintain the boreholes.

“School attendance by students and teachers will improve from enhanced sanitation and clean drinking water,” said McKeone, who is a graduate of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and has been living and working in Zambia since July 2012. “The schools currently have construction projects that have been delayed due to a lack of water, preventing completion of much needed classrooms, and these boreholes will allow for the completion of those projects.”

(Source: 1.usa.gov)

Zambia water education gender issues Africa global health clean water sanitation

Today we released the 2013 rankings of the top Volunteer-producing states and metropolitan areas across the country. Vermont reclaimed the No. 1 spot among states with the most Peace Corps Volunteers per capita with 7.8 volunteers for every 100,000 residents, a position it last held in 2010. Vermont also ranked among the top metro areas per capita. The Burlington-South Burlington metro area ranked second behind Ithaca, N.Y., where Volunteers accounted for 11.7 of every 100,000 residents.

California, New York and Texas continue to be the Peace Corps’ top states, and New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, and Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana held their positions as Peace Corps’ top metro areas.

(Source: 1.usa.gov)

California New York Vermont Washington DC Burlington


“Mentors build leadership skills, confidence, and gain volunteer experience. The young students are able to ask questions of peers and build positive relationships.”

Peace Corps Volunteers are working in Mongolia to promote a partnership between two local non-governmental organizations focused on volunteerism and mentorship among Mongolian youth. They’ve teamed up with an organization that prepares young Mongolian students to study abroad, and collaborated with a community youth center. By bringing their individual projects together, they implemented a volunteering program that gives young adults the opportunity to mentor children and lead activities at the youth center.

“Mentors build leadership skills, confidence, and gain volunteer experience. The young students are able to ask questions of peers and build positive relationships.”

Peace Corps Volunteers are working in Mongolia to promote a partnership between two local non-governmental organizations focused on volunteerism and mentorship among Mongolian youth. They’ve teamed up with an organization that prepares young Mongolian students to study abroad, and collaborated with a community youth center. By bringing their individual projects together, they implemented a volunteering program that gives young adults the opportunity to mentor children and lead activities at the youth center.

(Source: 1.usa.gov)

Mongolia IVD2013 International Volunteer Day volunteering community service youth NGO community

Ter is the first to point out that his story is only partially about him, and equally about the many friends and ‘family’ members who have adopted him – and whom he has adopted – throughout his unlikely global odyssey, from northwest Kenya to sunny Florida to the cold mountains of Azerbaijan and back to academia in Boston.

It is a story of kindness. And it is the story, in its elemental sense, of thanksgiving.

I’m not crying, YOU ARE!

(Source: bit.ly)

Sudan Africa Kenya University of Florida azerbaijan inspriational The Christian Science Monitor

In developing nations, a relatively simple footbridge can make the difference between getting an education and staying at home, between receiving health care and being sick. 

Peace Corps Response Volunteer Nate Bloss has been working with Bridging the Gap Africa as a project supervisor in Kenyan communities where people and economies are affected by the ability to cross waterways safely.

Check out these pictures from the “walking world” – and see how a bridge can make all the difference.

Kenya Africa Bridging the Gap Africa international development bridges

On the 50th anniversary of his passing, we honor the legacy of President John F. Kennedy. We trace our roots and mission to 1960, when then-Senator Kennedy challenged students at the University of Michigan to serve their country in the cause of peace by living and working in developing countries. His inspiration led to the establishment of this agency in 1961 with a mission to promote world peace and friendship.
Today, we are more vital than ever, working in collaboration with public and private partners in emerging and essential areas such as education, information technology, agriculture and environment, and business development in countries around the world. The Peace Corps is committed to giving all Americans who want to serve the opportunity to make a difference and bring their experience back home to enrich their communities here in the United States.

Since 1961, more than 215,000 Americans of all ages and backgrounds have responded to Kennedy’s enduring challenge, demonstrating how the power of an idea can capture the imagination of an entire nation.

On the 50th anniversary of his passing, we honor the legacy of President John F. Kennedy. We trace our roots and mission to 1960, when then-Senator Kennedy challenged students at the University of Michigan to serve their country in the cause of peace by living and working in developing countries. His inspiration led to the establishment of this agency in 1961 with a mission to promote world peace and friendship.

Today, we are more vital than ever, working in collaboration with public and private partners in emerging and essential areas such as education, information technology, agriculture and environment, and business development in countries around the world. The Peace Corps is committed to giving all Americans who want to serve the opportunity to make a difference and bring their experience back home to enrich their communities here in the United States.

Since 1961, more than 215,000 Americans of all ages and backgrounds have responded to Kennedy’s enduring challenge, demonstrating how the power of an idea can capture the imagination of an entire nation.

(Source: 1.usa.gov)

John F. Kennedy JFK Peace Corps University of Michigan

"I think their favorite part of the tour though was playing on the beach because many of them had never seen the ocean before.”

A group of Peace Corps Volunteers in Namibia recently came together in collaboration with a local nonprofit organization to lead a week-long educational tour of the country for 40 at-risk youth. The tour is an annual initiative led by Peace Corps Namibia’s diversity committee aimed at providing orphans and marginalized youth — many of whom have never traveled outside of their own community — with the opportunity to explore Namibia, develop a respect and appreciation for other local cultures, and build healthy lifestyle and leadership skills. 

(Source: peacecorps.gov)

Africa Namibia at-risk youth diversity culture health leadership travel

Peace Corps Volunteer Juliette Keeley worked with a group of young women during her service in Guinea to publish a magazine for girls that tackles tough issues routinely faced by young women in the country. The magazine, Aicha, addresses topics of interest to young women in the community – including education, fashion, agriculture, cooking and women’s rights – as well as more sensitive topics like women’s health, HIV/AIDS, early marriage and relationships.

Peace Corps Volunteer Juliette Keeley worked with a group of young women during her service in Guinea to publish a magazine for girls that tackles tough issues routinely faced by young women in the country. The magazine, Aicha, addresses topics of interest to young women in the community – including education, fashion, agriculture, cooking and women’s rights – as well as more sensitive topics like women’s health, HIV/AIDS, early marriage and relationships.