This is how I remember September 11th. 
I went on a school field trip with my teachers and students to the ruins of Old Leon, Nicaragua. After the field trip I was exhausted and hungry. I wanted to get home and make tuna casserole. However, my neighbors were adamant that I watch the news on their television. I acquiesced and found them watching a movie. I kept watching and watching, waiting for the credits to roll across the screen. They kept saying that this was real and happening in real life, that this was no movie, that this was a great tragedy in my country and for the world.
After we understood what was going on, my teachers and friends came to my house to check on me and my family in the States. I had not felt so much love and concern before that moment.
 For me, this picture evokes those memories of concern, love, and friendship. I like to remember September 11th as this picture.

- Peace Corps Volunteer R Diehl

This is how I remember September 11th. 

I went on a school field trip with my teachers and students to the ruins of Old Leon, Nicaragua. After the field trip I was exhausted and hungry. I wanted to get home and make tuna casserole. However, my neighbors were adamant that I watch the news on their television. I acquiesced and found them watching a movie. I kept watching and watching, waiting for the credits to roll across the screen. They kept saying that this was real and happening in real life, that this was no movie, that this was a great tragedy in my country and for the world.

After we understood what was going on, my teachers and friends came to my house to check on me and my family in the States. I had not felt so much love and concern before that moment.

 For me, this picture evokes those memories of concern, love, and friendship. I like to remember September 11th as this picture.

- Peace Corps Volunteer R Diehl

Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteer September 11th 9/11 Peace Corps Digital Library love friendship Nicaragua


The classroom will be a stimulating environment of lights, sounds and tactile experiences, specially designed to tap into the unique abilities of each student. The students have disabilities such as Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, mental retardation, or autism, as well as physical and behavioral disabilities. The new specialized learning materials, including adaptive computer technology, will allow each student to explore his or her senses and interact with the world in a more stimulating environment.

- Peace Corps Community Health Volunteer Ana De la Rosa, who is working with her local community to build a new classroom for students with learning disabilities and provide additional training at the local primary school in northern Peru

The classroom will be a stimulating environment of lights, sounds and tactile experiences, specially designed to tap into the unique abilities of each student. The students have disabilities such as Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, mental retardation, or autism, as well as physical and behavioral disabilities. The new specialized learning materials, including adaptive computer technology, will allow each student to explore his or her senses and interact with the world in a more stimulating environment.

- Peace Corps Community Health Volunteer Ana De la Rosa, who is working with her local community to build a new classroom for students with learning disabilities and provide additional training at the local primary school in northern Peru

Peru learning disabilities Peace Corps education community health physical disabilities bahaviroal disabilities Down syndrome cerebral palsy autism adaptive computer technology learning Peace Corps Partnership Program


This photo was taken on May 23, 2009 at a dance competition in Ecuador. Traditional Kichwa dances are performed at every public event in the Napo province and troupes are composed children of all ages. The dance steps describe traditional activities such as clearing fields, making guayusa tea, harvesting cacao and preparing chicha (traditional spit beer).

- Peace Corps Environment Volunteer Laurel Howard 

This photo was taken on May 23, 2009 at a dance competition in Ecuador. Traditional Kichwa dances are performed at every public event in the Napo province and troupes are composed children of all ages. The dance steps describe traditional activities such as clearing fields, making guayusa tea, harvesting cacao and preparing chicha (traditional spit beer).

- Peace Corps Environment Volunteer Laurel Howard 

Ecuador South America Kichwa dancing Peace Corps culture traditional dress

stompoutmalaria:

Weekly Awesome Mozambique: Training of Trainers in Zambezia Province

On Thursday July 5th, in Mocuba, Zambezia province, eight Peace Corps Health Volunteers, ten Mozambican counterparts, one representative from PIRCOM (Programa Inter-Religioso Contra a Malária), and one Peace Corps Staff member participated in a general malaria prevention “Training of Trainers.” The purpose of this workshop was two-fold: to propagate malaria prevention messages to the communities where participants live and to prepare PCVs and Mozambican counterparts to assist in the upcoming net distribution and spraying campaigns in the districts where they live and work.

Read more about the training here!

malaria Peace Corps Stomp Out Malaria training health Mozambique malaria prevention

Members of Peace Corps Volunteer Stephanie Bergado’s small island community pull the boat used to access their local health center boat to shore.

Stephanie is currently raising funds with her community in Vanuatu to install solar panels in the local community health center that will allow patients to be effectively treated after dark. The health center serves all 126 members of Bergado’s small island community and currently operates by flashlight or kerosene lamp during night hours. 

“The community relies heavily on the health center for all of its services, day and night, but many community members are reluctant to seek medical care when it’s dark,” said Bergado, a graduate of Southern Connecticut State University who has been living and working in Vanuatu since October 2011. “This can cause serious health complications and in some cases long term problems. The island is very isolated, and it can be extremely hard to receive batteries for flashlights or kerosene for lamps. This kind of patient care can be very difficult at times and can seriously affect the treatment given to a patient.” 

Funds raised by Bergado’s project will go toward purchasing a solar panel package with all the necessary equipment and materials. The community has agreed to contribute the cost of transporting the materials and labor needed to install the panels. In order to receive funding through the PCPP, a community must make a 25 percent contribution to the total project and outline success indicators for the individual projects. This helps ensure community ownership and a greater chance of long-term sustainability. 

“The health center building itself is strong and impressive, but without adequate lighting, it is crippled and it cannot have the positive effect it was intended to,” continued Bergado. “With a constant, renewable source of light from the solar panels, the health center can really make a difference for the health and well-being of my community.” 

Members of Peace Corps Volunteer Stephanie Bergado’s small island community pull the boat used to access their local health center boat to shore.

Stephanie is currently raising funds with her community in Vanuatu to install solar panels in the local community health center that will allow patients to be effectively treated after dark. The health center serves all 126 members of Bergado’s small island community and currently operates by flashlight or kerosene lamp during night hours. 

“The community relies heavily on the health center for all of its services, day and night, but many community members are reluctant to seek medical care when it’s dark,” said Bergado, a graduate of Southern Connecticut State University who has been living and working in Vanuatu since October 2011. “This can cause serious health complications and in some cases long term problems. The island is very isolated, and it can be extremely hard to receive batteries for flashlights or kerosene for lamps. This kind of patient care can be very difficult at times and can seriously affect the treatment given to a patient.” 

Funds raised by Bergado’s project will go toward purchasing a solar panel package with all the necessary equipment and materials. The community has agreed to contribute the cost of transporting the materials and labor needed to install the panels. In order to receive funding through the PCPP, a community must make a 25 percent contribution to the total project and outline success indicators for the individual projects. This helps ensure community ownership and a greater chance of long-term sustainability. 

“The health center building itself is strong and impressive, but without adequate lighting, it is crippled and it cannot have the positive effect it was intended to,” continued Bergado. “With a constant, renewable source of light from the solar panels, the health center can really make a difference for the health and well-being of my community.” 

(Source: donate.peacecorps.gov)

Pacific Islands Peace Corps Peace Corps Partnership Program Peace Corps Volunteers Vanuatu community development health pretty places boats