Peace Corps Volunteer Organizes Career Fair for 400 Moroccan Youth

Peace Corps Youth Development Volunteer Kathleen Howell-Burke organized a career fair for over 400 Moroccan students in Southeastern Morocco. During the fair, Moroccan professionals and college students from the area led panel discussions and workshops to help inspire Moroccan youth to pursue higher-level education and professional careers.

(Source: peacecorps.gov)

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"It’s possible to end this – in our lifetime. What we need are not slogans about African Illnesses, emotional appeals to Save Those In Need, or personal campaigns to Guilt Everyone Into Donating Money. My neighbors here in Senegal are working diligently to protect themselves from infection."
- Austin Post-Bulletin highlight on 3rd year volunteer Michael Toso http://postbulletin.com/news/stories/display.php?id=1494209 (via stompoutmalaria)

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Malaria is an incredibly deadly, pervasive disease. It kills between 750,000 to 1.2 million people every year, mostly children and pregnant women.
When you really see it at the local level, though, its real impact becomes clear. In my host family alone every single child had malaria last year at least once, some three or four times. It exacts an extraordinarily heavy toll on the health, productivity, and finances of the village, and nearly every family has lost children to the disease.
Prevention work can have incredibly positive effect on the well being of these families. Simple interventions like bed nets, indoor residual spraying and prompt treatment can save huge amounts of money, time and ultimately lives.

- Peace Corps Health Volunteer Ian Hennessee

Malaria is an incredibly deadly, pervasive disease. It kills between 750,000 to 1.2 million people every year, mostly children and pregnant women.

When you really see it at the local level, though, its real impact becomes clear. In my host family alone every single child had malaria last year at least once, some three or four times. It exacts an extraordinarily heavy toll on the health, productivity, and finances of the village, and nearly every family has lost children to the disease.

Prevention work can have incredibly positive effect on the well being of these families. Simple interventions like bed nets, indoor residual spraying and prompt treatment can save huge amounts of money, time and ultimately lives.

- Peace Corps Health Volunteer Ian Hennessee

Malaria Stomp Out Malaria health youth child mortality Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteer

Working in Malaria prevention is important primarily, because the disease is comparatively simple to prevent and yet remains a leading cause of death throughout Africa and many other parts of the developing world. Through the proper use of bed nets, covering up exposed skin during evening hours, and removing/covering sources of standing water around your home diminish the mosquito population and therefore your chances of catching malaria.  

From personal experience and living in Mozambique for the past 2 years, I can easily say that Malaria is one of the most diagnosed and treated cases at our local Hospital, and that all of my neighbors have been diagnosed or treated for malaria at some point in my service. I also say this while we are in the middle of our rainy season here in Mozambique, and already Malaria cases are beginning to skyrocket as the mosquito population begins to boom.

 Peace Corps Volunteer Jason Hillis

 

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stompoutmalaria:

Zambia, World Malaria Day 2012
The National Malaria Control Centre organized mobile clinics around townships to screen, test, and treat people.
The Peace Corps Stomp Out Malaria Coordinator Jane Coleman and a Linking Income and Food Environment Volunteer Laura Walls walked around with community health workers and their loud speakers, letting people know to come to the mobile clinic to get tested!
Jane and Laura spent the rest of the morning with the patients and staff screening, testing and treating mothers, children under five and even some of their fathers.
People were lined up around the clinic and many people went home with Coartem and will be happy and healthy for the month of May!

Peace Corps Volunteers World Malaria Day Zambia Africa Stomp Out Malaria

I’m starting to work on a Bed Net Distribution and Installation Campaign. My plan is have trainings/demonstrations to heads of households in the rural areas we visit on how to install the nets, then give them a net and check-sheet of how to do it and send them on their way. A week or so later we pop back in to inspect how it went. This plan is a bit stalled right now as we’re waiting for the seasonal shipment of nets to come in for distribution.

 Until new nets are available, I have been working in the rural areas with a local Health Extension Worker on installations of preexisting nets. This means sewing up holes, attempting to reinstall crazily hung nets, and just trying to keep my chin up.

Peace Corps Volunteer Jean DeMarco

(Source: lethiopiah.wordpress.com)

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Every Child Deserves a 5th Birthday 

More than 7 million children will die this year before they reach their 5th birthday. That number is equivalent to the entire population of New York City. And, even more disturbing, most of these children will die from preventable causes.

At the same time, as a global community, we have made staggering progress in the reduction of child mortality. Over the last 50 years, child mortality has been reduced by 70%. This result is largely due to high-impact tools and interventions for child survival, notably new vaccines and more community health workers.

However, we must not let this progress hide the reality that more than 7 million children are at risk every year. In rich and poor countries alike, the poorest and most disadvantaged children continue to miss out on lifesaving, affordable interventions.

The tremendous declines in child mortality in Rwanda, (over 50%), and the 28% decline in both Tanzania and Ethiopia prove that these simple, cost-effective interventions can save lives. Now is the time for every nation to build on this proven success.

All governments and citizens are responsible for the survival of their most vulnerable children. Stakeholders in every country – from the government to civil society to the faith community to the private sector – are responsible for the survival of the world’s children. Their existing commitments as well as future commitments must be fulfilled.

Ending preventable child deaths is possible, if we all work together.

(Source: 5thbday.usaid.gov)

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Peace Corps Volunteers Commemorate Earth Day

Peace Corps Volunteers worldwide commemorated Earth Day by working with people in their local communities to become more environmentally conscious and protect the local ecosystem. Volunteers regularly help communities organize recycling projects and environmental youth clubs, assist with park management, and forest, soil, and marine conservation.

(Source: go.usa.gov)

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Peace Corps Volunteers worldwide commemorate Global Youth Service Day by working with children, youth and young adults to be more active citizens in their communities. This year, many Volunteers are using Global Youth Service Day activities to promote environmental awareness on Earth Day. 

Observed April 20 to 22, Global Youth Service Day provides Volunteers with an opportunity to engage youth and local community members in long-term service projects. For more than 10 years, Peace Corps Volunteers and their community partners have celebrated Global Youth Service Day and Earth Day through various activities.

Throughout the year, Peace Corps Volunteers work with youth to foster skills for transitioning from school to work, and becoming engaged in their communities. Volunteers also develop extracurricular activities that help local youth build confidence and develop decision-making, communication and leadership skills that promote positive relationships with peers, parents and adults. 

Five percent of Peace Corps Volunteers work in the youth in community development sector as their primary assignment, while another 40 percent of Volunteers work in the education sector. 

(Source: go.usa.gov)

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Building a new home in rural Zambia takes a lot of time and effort. On May 30, 2008, in a small village in the Luapula province, much of the community helped to build a home of mud bricks and dried grass for a struggling family in the village. The photograph I took shows six women carrying pails of water from a nearby stream to the men who mix the water into mud to make new bricks and mortar.

- Peace Corps Agriculture Volunteer Jason Hays

Building a new home in rural Zambia takes a lot of time and effort. On May 30, 2008, in a small village in the Luapula province, much of the community helped to build a home of mud bricks and dried grass for a struggling family in the village. The photograph I took shows six women carrying pails of water from a nearby stream to the men who mix the water into mud to make new bricks and mortar.

- Peace Corps Agriculture Volunteer Jason Hays

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Peace Corps Volunteer Simon Williams is working with his Ukrainian village to build a community athletic field and create a soccer league for the local school. Williams, who played baseball professionally with the St. Louis Cardinals organization, says the current athletic field at the village school is inadequate. 

“The school sits on top of a hill and the field that they have is the size of half a basketball court, which is not sufficient for most physical education activities,” he explains. “Having been active in athletics my whole life, and knowing how soccer-crazy all these kids are, it would be great to see them have an adequate place to play.

“The plan is to make this a very hands-on project,” says the University of Maine graduate, who was Captain of the UMaine baseball team. “The village and its people have very little money but are excited to be a part of building a soccer field for the school.”

Williams has been working as a Youth Development volunteer since 2011, teaching English to students in a Kindergarten through 11th grade school. “We are playing stick-ball and the kids love it. I cut down a broom handle, bought a tennis ball and made the bases out of rocks and they are beginning to grasp the basics. The students always try for a home run, which is hilarious. I like their hustle,” he adds.

In order to receive funding through the Peace Corps Partnership Program, a community must make a 25 percent contribution to the total project cost and outline success indicators for the individual projects. This helps ensure community ownership and a greater chance of long-term sustainability.

One hundred percent of each tax-deductible PCPP donation goes toward a development project. Support Williams’ project in Ukraine

(Source: details for https)

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