The children in my village have taken me in at  their big sister, calling me “kakak” rather than my actual name. It’s  heart-warming. They love to take me to the sugarcane fields that  surround our village. They run with knifes, and it makes me nervous, but  it’s the norm here. Children run free here. I love this photograph  because I actually let Sylvie, a 9-year old with very sticky fingers  from the sugarcane juices, use my Canon SLR to take this. Whenever she  sees this photo, she proudly says “aku aku” or “mine mine”. 

Peace Corps Education Volunteer Elle Chang

The children in my village have taken me in at their big sister, calling me “kakak” rather than my actual name. It’s heart-warming. They love to take me to the sugarcane fields that surround our village. They run with knifes, and it makes me nervous, but it’s the norm here. Children run free here. I love this photograph because I actually let Sylvie, a 9-year old with very sticky fingers from the sugarcane juices, use my Canon SLR to take this. Whenever she sees this photo, she proudly says “aku aku” or “mine mine”. 

Peace Corps Education Volunteer Elle Chang

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This photo was taken in a community in Nicaragua during the month of May in 2011. As a maternal and child health Volunteer in El Jícaro, I assisted the doctors that day with collecting HIV tests. We ate lunch at a woman’s house, and she had five children, all very close in age. Her home was made of adobe, and she cooked everything over an open flame. The kids ran around barefoot and naked, except for this little girl who was in a pink, ruffly dress. One of the doctors had given her a piece of candy, and she seemed to treasure the candy more than anything. She didn’t want to eat it; she only wanted to hold it in her tiny hands! I titled this photo “Chigüina” because this word is what the people in the campo of Nicaragua use when they’re children.
- Peace Corps Health Volunteer Natalie Woodrum 

This photo was taken in a community in Nicaragua during the month of May in 2011. As a maternal and child health Volunteer in El Jícaro, I assisted the doctors that day with collecting HIV tests. We ate lunch at a woman’s house, and she had five children, all very close in age. Her home was made of adobe, and she cooked everything over an open flame. The kids ran around barefoot and naked, except for this little girl who was in a pink, ruffly dress. One of the doctors had given her a piece of candy, and she seemed to treasure the candy more than anything. She didn’t want to eat it; she only wanted to hold it in her tiny hands! I titled this photo “Chigüina” because this word is what the people in the campo of Nicaragua use when they’re children.

- Peace Corps Health Volunteer Natalie Woodrum 

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I ate fried Mopane (Mopani) worms for the first time here in South Africa. Well, they are not actually worms, they’re caterpillars. So, I guess you can say that I’m officially an insectivore now. Mopani worms are a local delicacy especially for the Shangaan people. Sometimes they are fried and other times they are boiled. People eat them here like potato chips or popcorn. Eventually, if these creatures are allowed to grow, they will become a beautiful Emperor moth.

- Peace Corps Education Volunteer Robin Al-haddad 

I ate fried Mopane (Mopani) worms for the first time here in South Africa. Well, they are not actually worms, they’re caterpillars. So, I guess you can say that I’m officially an insectivore now. Mopani worms are a local delicacy especially for the Shangaan people. Sometimes they are fried and other times they are boiled. People eat them here like potato chips or popcorn. Eventually, if these creatures are allowed to grow, they will become a beautiful Emperor moth.

- Peace Corps Education Volunteer Robin Al-haddad 

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todaysdocument:

The Peace Corps Act - September 22, 1961

On March 1, 1961, President Kennedy signed the executive order establishing the Peace Corps. On September 22, 1961, Congress approved the legislation that formally authorized the Peace Corps. Goals of the Peace Corps included: 1) helping the people of interested countries and areas meet their needs for trained workers; 2) helping promote a better understanding of Americans in countries where volunteers served; and 3) helping promote a better understanding of peoples of other nations on the part of Americans.

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ourpresidents:

Happy birthday, Peace Corps.  The toughest job you’ll ever love turns 50 this year; today marks the day that President Kennedy signed the Peace Corps Bill into law. 
Here’s to all the volunteers who have promoted peace and friendship around the world.  This photo from the 1960s features a Peace Corps Volunteer in Instanbul.
If you aren’t already following the Peace Corps on Tumblr, you can see many more pictures of volunteers at work here.

ourpresidents:

Happy birthday, Peace Corps.  The toughest job you’ll ever love turns 50 this year; today marks the day that President Kennedy signed the Peace Corps Bill into law. 

Here’s to all the volunteers who have promoted peace and friendship around the world.  This photo from the 1960s features a Peace Corps Volunteer in Instanbul.

If you aren’t already following the Peace Corps on Tumblr, you can see many more pictures of volunteers at work here.

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