congressarchives:

The concept of volunteers serving abroad on grass-roots foreign aid projects originated in Congress in the 1950s. In 1961 President John F. Kennedy established the Peace Corps by executive order. President Kennedy then sent this letter to Senate President (Vice President of the U.S.) Lyndon B. Johnson describing the successes of the Peace Corps program he had established. Kennedy included a draft bill authorizing the Peace Corps with his letter. Kennedy’s draft bill was identical to the bill Senator Hubert H. Humphrey introduced on June 1, 1961. President Kennedy signed S. 2000 into law on September 22, 1961. The Peace Corps celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2011.

Letter from President Kennedy to Lyndon Johnson, 5/29/1961, Records of the U.S. Senate

S. 2000, Peace Corps bill, 6/1/1961, Records of the U.S. Senate

US Senate US National Archives National Archives Congress Peace Corps JFK History Politics Peace Corps 50th Anniversary 1960s Presidents John F. Kennedy LBJ Lyndon B. Johnson Hubert H. Humphrey

the-sprawl:

This picture may not mean a lot to you, but it means a heck of a lot to me.
My hands down biggest project that I did in Ghana as a Peace Corps volunteer was to organize and run a week-long leadership camp for about 30 girls from over 5 communities. It was a hell of a lot of work and I couldn’t have done it without the support of my fellow volunteers and the community that we held the event in. 
One of the many activities the girls took part in during the week was the planting of vetiver grass. The guesthouse that we stayed in was situated on top of an incline and most of the top soil had been repeatedly washed away leaving the actual stability of the structure somewhat in danger. I have tons of photos that I took of the area before we set the girls to work that week, planting vetiver grass- one of the strongest and most successful grasses to help with soil erosion and slope protection.
We planted that grass last summer. The second GLOW camp (based off my camp) is happening this week and my friend sent me this picture to show how the grass has grown and is continuing to grow and support this building. In this whole scenario, the word “sustainability” actually means something.
I am so proud.

the-sprawl:

This picture may not mean a lot to you, but it means a heck of a lot to me.

My hands down biggest project that I did in Ghana as a Peace Corps volunteer was to organize and run a week-long leadership camp for about 30 girls from over 5 communities. It was a hell of a lot of work and I couldn’t have done it without the support of my fellow volunteers and the community that we held the event in. 

One of the many activities the girls took part in during the week was the planting of vetiver grass. The guesthouse that we stayed in was situated on top of an incline and most of the top soil had been repeatedly washed away leaving the actual stability of the structure somewhat in danger. I have tons of photos that I took of the area before we set the girls to work that week, planting vetiver grass- one of the strongest and most successful grasses to help with soil erosion and slope protection.

We planted that grass last summer. The second GLOW camp (based off my camp) is happening this week and my friend sent me this picture to show how the grass has grown and is continuing to grow and support this building. In this whole scenario, the word “sustainability” actually means something.

I am so proud.

ghana peace corps sustainability vetiver grass camp glow


Ibrahim was a resident at the Orphanage for Boys Handicapped with Polio located adjacent to the Koutubia Mosque in Marrakesh, Morocco. I worked at the orphanage and facilitated the adoption of a puppy to help enhance the quality of life for the boys and staff. The new addition was a huge success.

Peace Corps Community Development Volunteer Dorothy Andrake  - Morocco, 1974

Ibrahim was a resident at the Orphanage for Boys Handicapped with Polio located adjacent to the Koutubia Mosque in Marrakesh, Morocco. I worked at the orphanage and facilitated the adoption of a puppy to help enhance the quality of life for the boys and staff. The new addition was a huge success.

Peace Corps Community Development Volunteer Dorothy Andrake  - Morocco, 1974

Peace Corps Peace Corps Digital Library Morocco youth puppies orphanage Marrakesh Polio

VOTE! VOTE! VOTE!
YOU can decide the winner of our People’s Choice category in the 50th Anniversary Digital Library Photo Contest! Click on the photo to go to Facebook and LIKE your favorite photo. The photo with the most likes on Monday, September 19, at 11:59 PM EST will be the People’s Choice WINNER! 
Please reblog! The more votes, the better!

VOTE! VOTE! VOTE!

YOU can decide the winner of our People’s Choice category in the 50th Anniversary Digital Library Photo Contest! Click on the photo to go to Facebook and LIKE your favorite photo. The photo with the most likes on Monday, September 19, at 11:59 PM EST will be the People’s Choice WINNER! 

Please reblog! The more votes, the better!

(Source: facebook.com)

Facebook voting People's Choice Peace Corps Peace Corps Digital Library peace corps 50th anniversary photo contest Africa Asia Middle East Eastern Europe Pacific Islands Central America South America Central Asia North Africa current countries closed countries


An undisputed giant of world music, Senegalese artist and humanitarian Youssou N’Dour has raised Senegal’s exuberant mbalax style to global stature. Introduced to American audiences on seminal albums such as Paul Simon’s Graceland and Peter Gabriel’s So, N’Dour continues to influence virtually every realm of the international music scene, riding high on tumbling African rhythms and stratospheric vocals.

Celebrate Peace Corps’ 50th Anniversary with Youssou N’Dour at The John F. Kennedy Center for Performing Arts on Wednesday, September 21, 2011 at 6:00 p.m., in the Concert Hall at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.
Tickets are required. Reserved seating tickets, two per person, will be distributed on the day of the performance, beginning at 4 p.m. in the Hall of Nations.

An undisputed giant of world music, Senegalese artist and humanitarian Youssou N’Dour has raised Senegal’s exuberant mbalax style to global stature. Introduced to American audiences on seminal albums such as Paul Simon’s Graceland and Peter Gabriel’s So, N’Dour continues to influence virtually every realm of the international music scene, riding high on tumbling African rhythms and stratospheric vocals.

Celebrate Peace Corps’ 50th Anniversary with Youssou N’Dour at The John F. Kennedy Center for Performing Arts on Wednesday, September 21, 2011 at 6:00 p.m., in the Concert Hall at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

Tickets are required. Reserved seating tickets, two per person, will be distributed on the day of the performance, beginning at 4 p.m. in the Hall of Nations.

Africa African music Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Senegal Senegalese The John F. Kennedy Center for Performing Arts The Kennedy Center Youssou N'Dour mbalax music world music Peace Corps