Ibrahim was a resident at the Orphanage for Boys Handicapped with Polio located adjacent to the Koutubia Mosque in Marrakesh, Morocco. I worked at the orphanage and facilitated the adoption of a puppy to help enhance the quality of life for the boys and staff. The new addition was a huge success.

Peace Corps Community Development Volunteer Dorothy Andrake  - Morocco, 1974

Ibrahim was a resident at the Orphanage for Boys Handicapped with Polio located adjacent to the Koutubia Mosque in Marrakesh, Morocco. I worked at the orphanage and facilitated the adoption of a puppy to help enhance the quality of life for the boys and staff. The new addition was a huge success.

Peace Corps Community Development Volunteer Dorothy Andrake  - Morocco, 1974

Peace Corps Peace Corps Digital Library Morocco youth puppies orphanage Marrakesh Polio

VOTE! VOTE! VOTE!
YOU can decide the winner of our People’s Choice category in the 50th Anniversary Digital Library Photo Contest! Click on the photo to go to Facebook and LIKE your favorite photo. The photo with the most likes on Monday, September 19, at 11:59 PM EST will be the People’s Choice WINNER! 
Please reblog! The more votes, the better!

VOTE! VOTE! VOTE!

YOU can decide the winner of our People’s Choice category in the 50th Anniversary Digital Library Photo Contest! Click on the photo to go to Facebook and LIKE your favorite photo. The photo with the most likes on Monday, September 19, at 11:59 PM EST will be the People’s Choice WINNER! 

Please reblog! The more votes, the better!

(Source: facebook.com)

Facebook voting People's Choice Peace Corps Peace Corps Digital Library peace corps 50th anniversary photo contest Africa Asia Middle East Eastern Europe Pacific Islands Central America South America Central Asia North Africa current countries closed countries


An undisputed giant of world music, Senegalese artist and humanitarian Youssou N’Dour has raised Senegal’s exuberant mbalax style to global stature. Introduced to American audiences on seminal albums such as Paul Simon’s Graceland and Peter Gabriel’s So, N’Dour continues to influence virtually every realm of the international music scene, riding high on tumbling African rhythms and stratospheric vocals.

Celebrate Peace Corps’ 50th Anniversary with Youssou N’Dour at The John F. Kennedy Center for Performing Arts on Wednesday, September 21, 2011 at 6:00 p.m., in the Concert Hall at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.
Tickets are required. Reserved seating tickets, two per person, will be distributed on the day of the performance, beginning at 4 p.m. in the Hall of Nations.

An undisputed giant of world music, Senegalese artist and humanitarian Youssou N’Dour has raised Senegal’s exuberant mbalax style to global stature. Introduced to American audiences on seminal albums such as Paul Simon’s Graceland and Peter Gabriel’s So, N’Dour continues to influence virtually every realm of the international music scene, riding high on tumbling African rhythms and stratospheric vocals.

Celebrate Peace Corps’ 50th Anniversary with Youssou N’Dour at The John F. Kennedy Center for Performing Arts on Wednesday, September 21, 2011 at 6:00 p.m., in the Concert Hall at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

Tickets are required. Reserved seating tickets, two per person, will be distributed on the day of the performance, beginning at 4 p.m. in the Hall of Nations.

Africa African music Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Senegal Senegalese The John F. Kennedy Center for Performing Arts The Kennedy Center Youssou N'Dour mbalax music world music Peace Corps


This  is how I remember September 11th. I went on a school field trip with my  teachers and students to the ruins of Old Leon, Nicaragua. After the  field trip I was exhausted and hungry. I wanted to get home and make  tuna casserole. However, my neighbors were adamant that I watch the news  on their television. I acquiesced and found them watching a movie. I  kept watching and watching, waiting for the credits to roll across the  screen. They kept saying that this was real and happening in real life,  that this was no movie, that this was a great tragedy in my country and  for the world. After we understood what was going on, my teachers and  friends came to my house to check on me and my family in the States. I  had not felt so much love and concern before that moment. For me, this  picture evokes those memories of concern, love, and friendship. I like  to remember September 11th as this picture. 

Peace Corps Volunteer R Diehl, Nicaragua - 2001

This is how I remember September 11th. I went on a school field trip with my teachers and students to the ruins of Old Leon, Nicaragua. After the field trip I was exhausted and hungry. I wanted to get home and make tuna casserole. However, my neighbors were adamant that I watch the news on their television. I acquiesced and found them watching a movie. I kept watching and watching, waiting for the credits to roll across the screen. They kept saying that this was real and happening in real life, that this was no movie, that this was a great tragedy in my country and for the world. After we understood what was going on, my teachers and friends came to my house to check on me and my family in the States. I had not felt so much love and concern before that moment. For me, this picture evokes those memories of concern, love, and friendship. I like to remember September 11th as this picture. 

Peace Corps Volunteer R Diehl, Nicaragua - 2001

9/11/01 Nicaragua Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteer September 11th education host country nationals 9/11

stompoutmalaria:

Called “ashwabi” in the local language of Pidgin from Cameroon, this fabric was made for the 50th Anniversary of the Peace Corps. The background lists every Peace Corps county in Africa, and across the “ashwabi” says “50 years” in each country’s official language.  Pretty cool!

It arrived at our 2nd Boot Camp via our two Cameroon attendees. Thanks guys!

50th Anniversary Cameroon Peace Corps Pidgin ashwabi reblog