Make your own peace.
You can say anything you want about the world. You can say it’s beyond help. That man is more evil than good. That you never asked for the world you got. And you could be right. 
You can say anything you want about the Peace Corps. That it’s just do-gooders. That it doesn’t help peace. That it hasn’t made any difference. 
The Peace Corps isn’t disagreeing. That’s not what it’s about. 
The Peace Corps doesn’t shout, “Come make peace.” Peace doesn’t come that easy. It’s more of a separate peace. Maybe yours. No banners. No bands. No medals.
The Peace Corps might be for you if you could enjoy feeding children. Or repairing a tractor. Or teaching birth control. Or building a schoolhouse. Even if no one ends up using it. (Don’t think it hasn’t happened.)
The Peace Corps has no delusions of grandeur. Ask anyone who’s been in it. But there are enough people who come out of the Peace Corps with things they’ve learned they can’t forget. Good things.
There are more ways than you can find to help the world. The Peace Corps is just one way. It’s for someone who would rather do something. Anything. Instead of nothing.
It could be your way. 
Write The Peace Corps, Washington, D.C. 20525
Peace Corps Public Service Announcement - 1968

Make your own peace.

You can say anything you want about the world. You can say it’s beyond help. That man is more evil than good. That you never asked for the world you got. And you could be right. 

You can say anything you want about the Peace Corps. That it’s just do-gooders. That it doesn’t help peace. That it hasn’t made any difference. 

The Peace Corps isn’t disagreeing. That’s not what it’s about. 

The Peace Corps doesn’t shout, “Come make peace.” Peace doesn’t come that easy. It’s more of a separate peace. Maybe yours. No banners. No bands. No medals.

The Peace Corps might be for you if you could enjoy feeding children. Or repairing a tractor. Or teaching birth control. Or building a schoolhouse. Even if no one ends up using it. (Don’t think it hasn’t happened.)

The Peace Corps has no delusions of grandeur. Ask anyone who’s been in it. But there are enough people who come out of the Peace Corps with things they’ve learned they can’t forget. Good things.

There are more ways than you can find to help the world. The Peace Corps is just one way. It’s for someone who would rather do something. Anything. Instead of nothing.

It could be your way. 

Write The Peace Corps, Washington, D.C. 20525

Peace Corps Public Service Announcement - 1968

(Source: collection.peacecorps.gov)

Peace Corps vintage design vintage public service announcement 1960s black and white typography print print PSA peace recruitement

Okay, so that’s not exactly how the conversation went in the first episode of NBC’s sitcom Community but that’s how it should have gone. 
If you are thinking about dropping out of high school (or college) to become a Peace Corps Volunteer, you should considering the following facts about Peace Corps service:
You must be at least 18 years old and a U.S. citizen. 
Approximately 90% of our Volunteer jobs require a 4-year degree. Competitive non-degree candidates must have 3–5 years full-time work experience.
Our Volunteers are placed where their skills match the needs of host countries.
We look forward to receiving Ms. Perry’s application after she finishes her time at Greendale and gets a little more relevant experience!
Learn more about what it takes in our How Do I Become a Volunteer? section

Okay, so that’s not exactly how the conversation went in the first episode of NBC’s sitcom Community but that’s how it should have gone. 

If you are thinking about dropping out of high school (or college) to become a Peace Corps Volunteer, you should considering the following facts about Peace Corps service:

  • You must be at least 18 years old and a U.S. citizen. 
  • Approximately 90% of our Volunteer jobs require a 4-year degree. Competitive non-degree candidates must have 3–5 years full-time work experience.
  • Our Volunteers are placed where their skills match the needs of host countries.

We look forward to receiving Ms. Perry’s application after she finishes her time at Greendale and gets a little more relevant experience!

Learn more about what it takes in our How Do I Become a Volunteer? section

(Source: nbc.com)

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Photo by Amy Donnelly, Boston Red Sox
Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Joe Kennedy III (Dominican Republic, 2004-2006), whose great uncle President John F. Kennedy founded the Peace Corps in 1961, throws the ceremonial first pitch prior to the Boston Red Sox/Cleveland Indians game on Friday, August 4. 

Photo by Amy Donnelly, Boston Red Sox

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Joe Kennedy III (Dominican Republic, 2004-2006), whose great uncle President John F. Kennedy founded the Peace Corps in 1961, throws the ceremonial first pitch prior to the Boston Red Sox/Cleveland Indians game on Friday, August 4. 

(Source: photo.amyedonnelly.com)

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Sasha Cooper Morrison, a member of our Global Operations team and an RPCV from Paraguay, and Tom Balemesa, an Atlas Fellow from Uganda working for our Africa Region team, perform West African dancing that includes movements that are a combination of Guinean dances accompanied by Senegalese drums. They graciously offered their talents during a world dance party at Peace Corps HQ to help us celebrate our 50th Anniversary. 

(Source: on.fb.me)

dancing Africa West African Guinean Senegalese drums Atlas Fellows Peace Corps Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Peace Corps Headquarters