Illustration major students in a University of Connecticut “Topics in Illustration” fall 2010 class created a poster series using a variety of media to capture what they felt was the essence of the Peace Corps in honor of our 50th anniversary. These prints are currently on display at Peace Corps HQ in Washington, D.C. and will become a travelling exhibition throughout the University of Connecticut’s regional campus libraries.

(Source: sfa.uconn.edu)

University of Connecticut UConn art posters illustration peace corps 50th anniversary Peace Corps

"Our dream is to see our organic, award winning specialty coffee transform our community by increasing family income, providing jobs and helping community members reach their potential.”

Peace Corps Volunteers Santi and Kayla Proano, who worked with their community in Ecuador to develop a coffee tourism program

(Source: volunteerecuadorcoffeeworks.com)

coffee tourism eco-tourism Ecuador pretty places Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteers projects agriculture small business community development organic organic farming organic coffee harvest

Make your own peace.
You can say anything you want about the world. You can say it’s beyond help. That man is more evil than good. That you never asked for the world you got. And you could be right. 
You can say anything you want about the Peace Corps. That it’s just do-gooders. That it doesn’t help peace. That it hasn’t made any difference. 
The Peace Corps isn’t disagreeing. That’s not what it’s about. 
The Peace Corps doesn’t shout, “Come make peace.” Peace doesn’t come that easy. It’s more of a separate peace. Maybe yours. No banners. No bands. No medals.
The Peace Corps might be for you if you could enjoy feeding children. Or repairing a tractor. Or teaching birth control. Or building a schoolhouse. Even if no one ends up using it. (Don’t think it hasn’t happened.)
The Peace Corps has no delusions of grandeur. Ask anyone who’s been in it. But there are enough people who come out of the Peace Corps with things they’ve learned they can’t forget. Good things.
There are more ways than you can find to help the world. The Peace Corps is just one way. It’s for someone who would rather do something. Anything. Instead of nothing.
It could be your way. 
Write The Peace Corps, Washington, D.C. 20525
Peace Corps Public Service Announcement - 1968

Make your own peace.

You can say anything you want about the world. You can say it’s beyond help. That man is more evil than good. That you never asked for the world you got. And you could be right. 

You can say anything you want about the Peace Corps. That it’s just do-gooders. That it doesn’t help peace. That it hasn’t made any difference. 

The Peace Corps isn’t disagreeing. That’s not what it’s about. 

The Peace Corps doesn’t shout, “Come make peace.” Peace doesn’t come that easy. It’s more of a separate peace. Maybe yours. No banners. No bands. No medals.

The Peace Corps might be for you if you could enjoy feeding children. Or repairing a tractor. Or teaching birth control. Or building a schoolhouse. Even if no one ends up using it. (Don’t think it hasn’t happened.)

The Peace Corps has no delusions of grandeur. Ask anyone who’s been in it. But there are enough people who come out of the Peace Corps with things they’ve learned they can’t forget. Good things.

There are more ways than you can find to help the world. The Peace Corps is just one way. It’s for someone who would rather do something. Anything. Instead of nothing.

It could be your way. 

Write The Peace Corps, Washington, D.C. 20525

Peace Corps Public Service Announcement - 1968

(Source: collection.peacecorps.gov)

Peace Corps vintage design vintage public service announcement 1960s black and white typography print print PSA peace recruitement

Okay, so that’s not exactly how the conversation went in the first episode of NBC’s sitcom Community but that’s how it should have gone. 
If you are thinking about dropping out of high school (or college) to become a Peace Corps Volunteer, you should considering the following facts about Peace Corps service:
You must be at least 18 years old and a U.S. citizen. 
Approximately 90% of our Volunteer jobs require a 4-year degree. Competitive non-degree candidates must have 3–5 years full-time work experience.
Our Volunteers are placed where their skills match the needs of host countries.
We look forward to receiving Ms. Perry’s application after she finishes her time at Greendale and gets a little more relevant experience!
Learn more about what it takes in our How Do I Become a Volunteer? section

Okay, so that’s not exactly how the conversation went in the first episode of NBC’s sitcom Community but that’s how it should have gone. 

If you are thinking about dropping out of high school (or college) to become a Peace Corps Volunteer, you should considering the following facts about Peace Corps service:

  • You must be at least 18 years old and a U.S. citizen. 
  • Approximately 90% of our Volunteer jobs require a 4-year degree. Competitive non-degree candidates must have 3–5 years full-time work experience.
  • Our Volunteers are placed where their skills match the needs of host countries.

We look forward to receiving Ms. Perry’s application after she finishes her time at Greendale and gets a little more relevant experience!

Learn more about what it takes in our How Do I Become a Volunteer? section

(Source: nbc.com)

Abed Nadir Britta Perry Community FAQ Frequently Asked Questions NBC Peace Corps Peace Corps requirements dropping out of school to join the Peace Corps things you shouldn't do Abed Britta