whereintheworldisflick:

This is Sheepo; one of my best learners. I just call him Shep. He is really a good kid so I invited him to a leadership conference called E.W.A. that a bunch of Peace Corps volunteers put together. Also, for some reason all of my kids love to have their picture taken with my laptop. Whatever floats their boat I guess.

whereintheworldisflick:

This is Sheepo; one of my best learners. I just call him Shep. He is really a good kid so I invited him to a leadership conference called E.W.A. that a bunch of Peace Corps volunteers put together. Also, for some reason all of my kids love to have their picture taken with my laptop. Whatever floats their boat I guess.

San Dancers from Botswana on the Peace Corps World Stage at Smithsonian Folklife Festival 2011
The San are a people native to the Kalihari Desert of southern Africa whose territory covers parts of South Africa, Zimbabwe, Lesotho, Mozambique, Swaziland, Botswana, Namibia, and Angola. Alternately referred to as “Bushmen”, Kung, Sho, Barwa, or Khwe, the San were traditionally nomadic foragers who lived in small bands. In recent decades, the roughly 100,000 remaining San people have transitioned from hunter-gatherers to settled farmers. 
The traditional dances of the San have been performed by the San/Basarwa/Bushmen people in southern Africa for tens of thousands of years, and are used in social, religious, and healing contexts.  

San Dancers from Botswana on the Peace Corps World Stage at Smithsonian Folklife Festival 2011

The San are a people native to the Kalihari Desert of southern Africa whose territory covers parts of South Africa, Zimbabwe, Lesotho, Mozambique, Swaziland, Botswana, Namibia, and Angola. Alternately referred to as “Bushmen”, Kung, Sho, Barwa, or Khwe, the San were traditionally nomadic foragers who lived in small bands. In recent decades, the roughly 100,000 remaining San people have transitioned from hunter-gatherers to settled farmers.

The traditional dances of the San have been performed by the San/Basarwa/Bushmen people in southern Africa for tens of thousands of years, and are used in social, religious, and healing contexts.  

Peace Corps Smithsonian Folklife Festival Botswana current countries Africa dancers dancing

According to various traditions throughout the world, “wish trees” posses spiritual power to which offerings are made. At the Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Peace Corps offered attendees the opportunity to attach messages to a wish tree to honor the memory of Peace Corps friends lost or to offer good will to Peace Corps Volunteers and partners around the world.

According to various traditions throughout the world, “wish trees” posses spiritual power to which offerings are made. At the Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Peace Corps offered attendees the opportunity to attach messages to a wish tree to honor the memory of Peace Corps friends lost or to offer good will to Peace Corps Volunteers and partners around the world.

Peace Corps Smithsonian Folklife Festival wish tree traditions


“I’m inspired by the work of Peace Corps Volunteers around the world. Volunteers share their creativity and compassion with their local communities. I hope this print inspires the next generation of Volunteers.” - Shepard Fairey

Fairey has a personal connection with the Peace Corps through his sister, who served as a Volunteer in Togo.

“I’m inspired by the work of Peace Corps Volunteers around the world. Volunteers share their creativity and compassion with their local communities. I hope this print inspires the next generation of Volunteers.” - Shepard Fairey

Fairey has a personal connection with the Peace Corps through his sister, who served as a Volunteer in Togo.

Shepard Fairey Peace Corps art fundraising 50th anniversary

 
Peace Corps Volunteer Shelia Slemp is joined by Ukrainian friends for a cooking demonstration at the Folklife Festival.  They are cooking red borscht — beet based soup enjoyed with smetana (sour cream).
Later in the week, Slemp is singing, acting, and dancing with the Opika Performance Group, a group of nine young students from Ukraine. The group also educates the community, through performance art, about quality of life issues impacting Western Ukraine. 

 

Peace Corps Volunteer Shelia Slemp is joined by Ukrainian friends for a cooking demonstration at the Folklife Festival.  They are cooking red borscht — beet based soup enjoyed with smetana (sour cream).

Later in the week, Slemp is singing, acting, and dancing with the Opika Performance Group, a group of nine young students from Ukraine. The group also educates the community, through performance art, about quality of life issues impacting Western Ukraine. 

Peace Corps Smithsonian Folklife Festival borscht current countries food peace corps volunteer Ukraine