"I love the ocean and have shared that passion with kids in my community. The potential for tourism and economic development exists here, but a focus on coastal conservation is needed to realize that potential."

Peace Corps Education Volunteer Patrick McGettigan, who recently organized a three-day Ocean Fair in Mozambique to promote coastal conservation

(Source: peacecorps.gov)

education conservation ocean environment tourism economic devlopment travel community development youth development water

During her service, Peace Corps Volunteer Rachael Saler taught Filipino women to crochet discarded plastic bags into colorful handbags and change purses as a way to engage local communities in business ventures, and teach environmental awareness and recycling. Since the Bag-O Plastic project launched in August 2010, more than 100 women from Bago City in the Philippines have sold 200 bags, earning 63,000 pesos (about $1,500).

For each bag that is sold, the woman who crocheted it receives 80 percent of the earnings. The other 20 percent goes toward the purchasing of zipper, runners, tags, etc. Each woman collects, segregates and washes plastic bags to be crocheted and sold. Women have also begun exchanging plastic bags for rice with other merchants and started plastic-bag collection bins in local commercial areas.

Rachael, who holds a master’s degree from Columbia University and a bachelor’s from Syracuse University, credits her mother for the Bag-O Plastic idea. When her parents visited in 2009, Saler’s mother told her to consider crocheting recycled plastic bags into handbags. Rachael was so inspired by the project she extended her Peace Corps service for a third year to continue it. She completed her Peace Corps service in December 2011.

Philippines recyling artisans environment small business development Gender empowerment fashion purses Columbia University Syracuse University

World Water Day: Did you know?

85% of the world population lives in the driest half of the planet


6 to 8 million people die annually from the consequences of disasters and water-related diseases


About 66% of Africa is arid or semi-arid and more than 300 of the 800 million people in sub-Saharan Africa live in a water-scarce environment


Water for irrigation and food production constitutes one of the greatest pressures on freshwater resources. Agriculture accounts for ~70% of global freshwater withdrawals (up to 90% in some fast-growing economies)

World Water Day: Did you know?

  • 85% of the world population lives in the driest half of the planet

  • 6 to 8 million people die annually from the consequences of disasters and water-related diseases

  • About 66% of Africa is arid or semi-arid and more than 300 of the 800 million people in sub-Saharan Africa live in a water-scarce environment

  • Water for irrigation and food production constitutes one of the greatest pressures on freshwater resources. Agriculture accounts for ~70% of global freshwater withdrawals (up to 90% in some fast-growing economies)

statistics United Nations World Water Day agriculture environment freshwater Africa hygenie

"Water holds the key to sustainable development, we must work together to protect and carefully manage this fragile, finite resource."  - United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon

Happy World Water Day!

World Water Day is held annually on March 22 focusing attention on the importance of freshwater and advocating for the sustainable management of freshwater resources.

Our Volunteers around the world work with local governments, clinics, nongovernmental organizations, and communities at the grassroots level, where the need is most urgent and the impact can be the greatest, focusing on outreach, social and behavior change in public health, hygiene and water sanitation.

(Source: peacecorps.gov)

World Water Day United Nations water sustainable development freshwater global health public health sanitation hygenie handwashing environment grassroots development nature education Peace Corps Volunteers

sheenabeenaghana:

Cashew nursery at the primary school cashew farm - Reality, most of these kids may become farmers or inherit the land of their fathers and mothers. Might as well start easy with some hands on lessons in tree nurseries and grafting. My hope is that the school cashew farm can be a leading example in the village for other farmers. We will see!  

Ghana Africa youth agriculture cashews farming food food security sustainability Peace Corps Volunteers reblogs tree nurseries environment