Every Child Deserves a 5th Birthday 

More than 7 million children will die this year before they reach their 5th birthday. That number is equivalent to the entire population of New York City. And, even more disturbing, most of these children will die from preventable causes.

At the same time, as a global community, we have made staggering progress in the reduction of child mortality. Over the last 50 years, child mortality has been reduced by 70%. This result is largely due to high-impact tools and interventions for child survival, notably new vaccines and more community health workers.

However, we must not let this progress hide the reality that more than 7 million children are at risk every year. In rich and poor countries alike, the poorest and most disadvantaged children continue to miss out on lifesaving, affordable interventions.

The tremendous declines in child mortality in Rwanda, (over 50%), and the 28% decline in both Tanzania and Ethiopia prove that these simple, cost-effective interventions can save lives. Now is the time for every nation to build on this proven success.

All governments and citizens are responsible for the survival of their most vulnerable children. Stakeholders in every country – from the government to civil society to the faith community to the private sector – are responsible for the survival of the world’s children. Their existing commitments as well as future commitments must be fulfilled.

Ending preventable child deaths is possible, if we all work together.

(Source: 5thbday.usaid.gov)

USAID child mortality health youth children

stompoutmalaria:

In September 2011, Health PCV Emily Engel from Anchorage, AL worked with her counterparts Haoua Ouédraogo and Mamouna Zida to promote neem cream production. The group created a full day workshop to reach all of the satellite villages in their health jurisdiction. During the workshop 55 women from surrounding villages learned about the basics of malaria, the business of selling neem cream and how to make the locally produced mosquito repellant.

Women in Kalsaka formed a group to produce neem cream after the workshop. They sell neem cream in small bags for 150 cfa and 200 cfa. The group is also working to produce liquid soap and hard soap as well as encouraging the women to have their own small businesses. Burkina is the second largest producer of Shea Butter in the world, so this major ingredient in neem cream is easily found in most small villages. The project is an inexpensive and popular among volunteers and communities in Burkina Faso.

health Malaria Burkina Faso Africa Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteers neem cream soap small business shea butter

stompoutmalaria:

Weekly Awesome, Burkina Faso: The “Fight Against Malaria” Song with PCV Sara Goodman

PCV Sara Goodman is Non-Formal Education Volunteer posted in Burkina Faso who serves on Peace Corps Burkina Faso’s Community Health and AIDS Task-force, a group charged with promoting malaria prevention and treatment activities among the volunteer community.  In addition to being an awesome volunteer and health promoter, Sara is also quite the musician, having studied Instrumental Music Education at the University of Illinois.  To engage volunteers and communities in the fight against malaria Sara created this music video for the parody song “Lutter Contre Palu*.”  Check out the lyrics below and sing along!


“Lutter Contre Palu” Lyrics

C’est la faut des moustiques qui causent le palu

Trop des piqures ça va fait mal

C’est un maladie qui est endémique

Ici au Burkina et partout l’Afrique

Est-ce-que c’est mieux ou c’est le pire

Il faut que nous allons decrire

Qu’est ce que vous pouvez faire pour prevenir

Est-ce-que c’est mieux ou c’est le pire

Il faut que nous allons decrire

Qu’est ce que vous pouvez faire pour prevenir

 

Il faut dormir sous un moustiquaire

Qui est très bien attaché

Il faut utiliser le pommade de neem

Après laver et avant dormir

Il faut lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, contre palu

Il faut lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, contre palu

Il faut lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, contre palu

Parce que ça va sauvegarder beaucoup des vies

 

Si vous aller dormir dehors ce soir

Il faut être protéger

Attacher le moustiquaire parmi les arbres

Et vous pouvez dormir sans les piqures

 

Si vous avez froid il faut faire attention

Si vous avez aussi le fievre

Il faut vous vous emballez dans un pagne mouiller

Et allez immediatement au dispensaire

 

Est-ce-que c’est mieux ou c’est le pire

Il faut que nous allons decrire

Qu’est ce que vous pouvez faire pour prevenir

Il faut lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, contre palu

Il faut lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, contre palu

Il faut lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, contre palu

Parce que ça va sauvegarder beaucoup des vies

 

*this parody song is in compliance with the fair-use clause in U.S copyright law.

 

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Peace Corps Volunteer Tackles a Sensitive Women’s Health Problem in Uganda

When Stacey Frankenstein-Markon discovered that girls in Uganda often used rags, old socks or wads of newspapers to do the job of sanitary napkins, she was shocked. She was even more horrified to realize that purchasing commercial pads was an impossible dream for most of them, since they come from families of subsistence farmers making about $1 a day in disposable income. 

“Disposable pads cost $1 for an 8-pack,” says the 25-year-old Peace Corps Volunteer, who with her husband, Tony Markon, is serving in Uganda as part of Michigan Technological University’s Peace Corps Master’s International (PCMI) program in applied science education. “If a family has three daughters who need pads, that family would have to spend 20 percent of their income just on menstrual pads. Who can afford to do that?”

The pad problem also was leading girls to stay away from school, fearing that they might stain their clothes and be badgered by boys, Frankenstein-Markon said.  Eventually, they fall so far behind that they have to drop out. 

But thanks to the inventiveness of another Peace Corps Volunteer who had served in the eastern Ugandan region just before the Markons got there in 2010, the Michigan Tech student has been able to help hundreds of girls practice better hygiene while they learn about menstruation, their bodies and women’s health.  And not incidentally, stay in school. 

(Source: mtu.edu)

Africa Master's International Peace Corps Volunteer Peace corps Uganda gender gender inequality health hygenie menstruation reproductive health sanitary napkins women's health Michigan Tech graduate school grad school

The Children’s Garden is an essential project as it will provide children with the opportunity to learn about nutrition while encouraging them to grow their own crops of which they can take home to their families.

Many children and adults currently do not have access to fresh fruits and vegetables within the village. Therefore, a significant portion of the population tends to be undernourished due to the lack of diversity and essential nutrients in their diets.

Peace Corps Community Development Volunteer Christina Alexander

(Source: peacecorps.gov)

Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteers community development diet food fruits gardening gardens health nutrition school vegetables youth Botswana Africa

lwsiv:

 
For three weeks during the winter school break another volunteer and myself ran a youth-camp.  There were approximately 24 kids, between the ages of 7-12, with a roughly even percentage of boys and girls.  We met every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday between the hours of 9-12pm for a total of 9 sessions. 
The cross-sector camp was a collaboration between the Health and Business sector in the department of Rivas. Covered topics included:  HIV/AIDS awareness, Gender Roles in Society, Self-esteem, Communication, Manualidades, Decision Making, Planning for the future, Leadership, and Creativity.  
súper vacaciones campamento
10 de febrero de 2012 - San Jorge, Rivas 

lwsiv:

For three weeks during the winter school break another volunteer and myself ran a youth-camp.  There were approximately 24 kids, between the ages of 7-12, with a roughly even percentage of boys and girls.  We met every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday between the hours of 9-12pm for a total of 9 sessions. 

The cross-sector camp was a collaboration between the Health and Business sector in the department of Rivas. Covered topics included:  HIV/AIDS awareness, Gender Roles in Society, Self-esteem, Communication, Manualidades, Decision Making, Planning for the future, Leadership, and Creativity.  

súper vacaciones campamento

10 de febrero de 2012 - San Jorge, Rivas 

Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteer reblogs youth health HIV/AIDS gender communications leadership creativity


I am in the middle of helping create bathrooms for an elementary school of 200 students in Morocco. This is a view taken from the top of the bathroom, looking down. This picture was taken by a Moroccan volunteer using my camera. The volunteers are wetting the cement, then they will mix it, and pass it on to the top of the bathroom so they can finish creating the ceiling.

Peace Corps Health Volunteer Samantha Spencer

I am in the middle of helping create bathrooms for an elementary school of 200 students in Morocco. This is a view taken from the top of the bathroom, looking down. This picture was taken by a Moroccan volunteer using my camera. The volunteers are wetting the cement, then they will mix it, and pass it on to the top of the bathroom so they can finish creating the ceiling.

Peace Corps Health Volunteer Samantha Spencer

Morocco Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteer Peace Corps Digital Library health hygenie

Peace Corps Volunteer Allegra Panetto of Haworth, N.J., is working with a local health center in the eastern part of Malawi to power electricity in several of the health center’s rooms using solar energy. A portion of the funds for the project were raised through the Peace Corps Partnership Program (PCPP) that helps fund Peace Corps Volunteer community projects worldwide.

"Each month, more than 60 infants are delivered at the health center. Half of these infants are delivered in the middle of the night, and because it only has lights in the labor ward and out-patient room, mothers’ pre-and post-delivery must wait in a room without electricity,” said Panetto, a Columbia University graduate. “Installing solar energy at the health center will better the lives of both the patients and staff.”

The health center serves more than 17,000 people in 35 villages near the shores of Lake Malawi. Prior to installing the solar panels in the health clinic, the staff will renovate the in-patient room and staff housing to prepare for the installation. In 2009, solar electricity was already installed in the out-patient room and labor ward.

"The sun’s power is the sustaining forces behind this project,” said Panetto, who has been working as a health Volunteer in Malawi since July 2010. “The area is a very hot and sunny, even during rainy season. The acquisition of electricity to the in-patient dorm will increase the capacity of patient attendants, nurses, and family members to care for patients – expectant or new mothers, or those suffering from life-threatening diseases.”

In order to receive funding through the PCPP, a community must make a 25 percent contribution to the total project cost and outline success indicators for the individual projects. This helps ensure community ownership and a greater chance of long-term sustainability.

Malawi Africa Peace Corps Partnership Program health solar energy babies maternal health infant health sustainable energy sustainability Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteer host country nationals

Youth Sports Center (Peace Corps Secondary Project)

maybesproutwings:

As many of you know, in addition to teaching English as a Peace Corps Volunteer, I am also involved in youth development work in my community, with a focus on healthy lifestyles. In that vein, my Ukrainian counterparts and I have organized and submitted a grant proposal with the intent of providing the local youth sports center with much needed equipment (from sports equipment to heating units.) Please take a look at the project, and if you’re able to, donate! Even if you’re not personally able to donate to the project, please forward the information to anyone and everyone you think would be interested in being part of this undertaking!

(PS I will be promoting this project endlessly until it’s funded, so be prepared!!)

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This photo was taken at a World AIDS Day vigil in Fiji on Dec. 1, 2009. Stakeholders in reproductive health organized the event which included personal testimony, a puppet show about prevention, and speakers from each major religious denomination who spoke on uniting for the cause. This photo shows the candle lighting on a large red ribbon. There were 311 candles to represent the confirmed cases of HIV on the island at the time. - Peace Corps Youth Development Volunteer Sarah Taylor

Thank you for reading, watching, and reblogging during our Worlds AIDS Day 2011 commemoration. December 1st is just one day out of many that Peace Corps Volunteers work to stop the spread of HIV and AIDS around the world. For more information on what Peace Corps Volunteers do, visit www.peacecorps.gov/hiv

This photo was taken at a World AIDS Day vigil in Fiji on Dec. 1, 2009. Stakeholders in reproductive health organized the event which included personal testimony, a puppet show about prevention, and speakers from each major religious denomination who spoke on uniting for the cause. This photo shows the candle lighting on a large red ribbon. There were 311 candles to represent the confirmed cases of HIV on the island at the time. - Peace Corps Youth Development Volunteer Sarah Taylor

Thank you for reading, watching, and reblogging during our Worlds AIDS Day 2011 commemoration. December 1st is just one day out of many that Peace Corps Volunteers work to stop the spread of HIV and AIDS around the world. For more information on what Peace Corps Volunteers do, visit www.peacecorps.gov/hiv

World AIDS Day Peace Corps Volunteers Peace Corps HIV/AIDS Fiji candlelight vigil health