On the 50th anniversary of his passing, we honor the legacy of President John F. Kennedy. We trace our roots and mission to 1960, when then-Senator Kennedy challenged students at the University of Michigan to serve their country in the cause of peace by living and working in developing countries. His inspiration led to the establishment of this agency in 1961 with a mission to promote world peace and friendship.
Today, we are more vital than ever, working in collaboration with public and private partners in emerging and essential areas such as education, information technology, agriculture and environment, and business development in countries around the world. The Peace Corps is committed to giving all Americans who want to serve the opportunity to make a difference and bring their experience back home to enrich their communities here in the United States.

Since 1961, more than 215,000 Americans of all ages and backgrounds have responded to Kennedy’s enduring challenge, demonstrating how the power of an idea can capture the imagination of an entire nation.

On the 50th anniversary of his passing, we honor the legacy of President John F. Kennedy. We trace our roots and mission to 1960, when then-Senator Kennedy challenged students at the University of Michigan to serve their country in the cause of peace by living and working in developing countries. His inspiration led to the establishment of this agency in 1961 with a mission to promote world peace and friendship.

Today, we are more vital than ever, working in collaboration with public and private partners in emerging and essential areas such as education, information technology, agriculture and environment, and business development in countries around the world. The Peace Corps is committed to giving all Americans who want to serve the opportunity to make a difference and bring their experience back home to enrich their communities here in the United States.

Since 1961, more than 215,000 Americans of all ages and backgrounds have responded to Kennedy’s enduring challenge, demonstrating how the power of an idea can capture the imagination of an entire nation.

(Source: 1.usa.gov)

John F. Kennedy JFK Peace Corps University of Michigan

ourpresidents:

It’s Peace Corps Week 
Peace Corps Week commemorates the date President John F. Kennedy signed the executive order to establish the Peace Corps, March 1, 1961.
Learn more about the Peace Corps and the Volunteers who are making a different in host countries around the world here.Pictured: President Kennedy hands the pen used to sign the Peace Corps Act to his brother-in-law, R. Sargent Shriver, who he had designated as the Corps founding Director.
-JFK and the Peace Corps from the JFK Library

ourpresidents:

It’s Peace Corps Week

Peace Corps Week commemorates the date President John F. Kennedy signed the executive order to establish the Peace Corps, March 1, 1961.

Learn more about the Peace Corps and the Volunteers who are making a different in host countries around the world here.


Pictured: President Kennedy hands the pen used to sign the Peace Corps Act to his brother-in-law, R. Sargent Shriver, who he had designated as the Corps founding Director.

-JFK and the Peace Corps from the JFK Library

Peace Corps Week reblogs Sargent Shriver John F. Kennedy JFK President Kennedy history JFK Library

todaysdocument:

The Peace Corps Act - September 22, 1961

On March 1, 1961, President Kennedy signed the executive order establishing the Peace Corps. On September 22, 1961, Congress approved the legislation that formally authorized the Peace Corps. Goals of the Peace Corps included: 1) helping the people of interested countries and areas meet their needs for trained workers; 2) helping promote a better understanding of Americans in countries where volunteers served; and 3) helping promote a better understanding of peoples of other nations on the part of Americans.

Peace Corps 50th Anniversary Peace Corps volunteers today in history Today's Document John F. Kennedy 1961 1960s Black and White

ourpresidents:

Happy birthday, Peace Corps.  The toughest job you’ll ever love turns 50 this year; today marks the day that President Kennedy signed the Peace Corps Bill into law. 
Here’s to all the volunteers who have promoted peace and friendship around the world.  This photo from the 1960s features a Peace Corps Volunteer in Instanbul.
If you aren’t already following the Peace Corps on Tumblr, you can see many more pictures of volunteers at work here.

ourpresidents:

Happy birthday, Peace Corps.  The toughest job you’ll ever love turns 50 this year; today marks the day that President Kennedy signed the Peace Corps Bill into law. 

Here’s to all the volunteers who have promoted peace and friendship around the world.  This photo from the 1960s features a Peace Corps Volunteer in Instanbul.

If you aren’t already following the Peace Corps on Tumblr, you can see many more pictures of volunteers at work here.

JFK John F. Kennedy Peace Corps Presidents Volunteers Istanbul

congressarchives:

The concept of volunteers serving abroad on grass-roots foreign aid projects originated in Congress in the 1950s. In 1961 President John F. Kennedy established the Peace Corps by executive order. President Kennedy then sent this letter to Senate President (Vice President of the U.S.) Lyndon B. Johnson describing the successes of the Peace Corps program he had established. Kennedy included a draft bill authorizing the Peace Corps with his letter. Kennedy’s draft bill was identical to the bill Senator Hubert H. Humphrey introduced on June 1, 1961. President Kennedy signed S. 2000 into law on September 22, 1961. The Peace Corps celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2011.

Letter from President Kennedy to Lyndon Johnson, 5/29/1961, Records of the U.S. Senate

S. 2000, Peace Corps bill, 6/1/1961, Records of the U.S. Senate

US Senate US National Archives National Archives Congress Peace Corps JFK History Politics Peace Corps 50th Anniversary 1960s Presidents John F. Kennedy LBJ Lyndon B. Johnson Hubert H. Humphrey

Photo by Amy Donnelly, Boston Red Sox
Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Joe Kennedy III (Dominican Republic, 2004-2006), whose great uncle President John F. Kennedy founded the Peace Corps in 1961, throws the ceremonial first pitch prior to the Boston Red Sox/Cleveland Indians game on Friday, August 4. 

Photo by Amy Donnelly, Boston Red Sox

Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Joe Kennedy III (Dominican Republic, 2004-2006), whose great uncle President John F. Kennedy founded the Peace Corps in 1961, throws the ceremonial first pitch prior to the Boston Red Sox/Cleveland Indians game on Friday, August 4. 

(Source: photo.amyedonnelly.com)

Boston Red Sox New England Red Sox Boston Kennedy Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteers Returned Peace Corps Volunteers peace corps 50th anniversary baseball President Kennedy John F. Kennedy