"This project will give all community members closer access to water, creates a committee that will take control and responsibility of the water system, and decreases the problems caused by unsanitary water. This is a beautiful community with wonderful, motivated people who are willing to contribute and sacrifice time and effort to have access to water."
- Peace Corps Volunteer Rodolfo Torres is working with his community in the Dominican Republic to build a rainwater collection system for 50 families.

(Source: go.usa.gov)

Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteer Peace Corps Partnership Program water Dominican Republic rainwater

Peace Corps Volunteer Organizes Career Fair for 400 Moroccan Youth

Peace Corps Youth Development Volunteer Kathleen Howell-Burke organized a career fair for over 400 Moroccan students in Southeastern Morocco. During the fair, Moroccan professionals and college students from the area led panel discussions and workshops to help inspire Moroccan youth to pursue higher-level education and professional careers.

(Source: peacecorps.gov)

Peace Corps Youth Development Peace Corps Volunteer Morocco career development youth professional development

"It’s possible to end this – in our lifetime. What we need are not slogans about African Illnesses, emotional appeals to Save Those In Need, or personal campaigns to Guilt Everyone Into Donating Money. My neighbors here in Senegal are working diligently to protect themselves from infection."
- Austin Post-Bulletin highlight on 3rd year volunteer Michael Toso http://postbulletin.com/news/stories/display.php?id=1494209 (via stompoutmalaria)

malaria Stomp Out Malaria Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteer Africa health


Malaria is an incredibly deadly, pervasive disease. It kills between 750,000 to 1.2 million people every year, mostly children and pregnant women.
When you really see it at the local level, though, its real impact becomes clear. In my host family alone every single child had malaria last year at least once, some three or four times. It exacts an extraordinarily heavy toll on the health, productivity, and finances of the village, and nearly every family has lost children to the disease.
Prevention work can have incredibly positive effect on the well being of these families. Simple interventions like bed nets, indoor residual spraying and prompt treatment can save huge amounts of money, time and ultimately lives.

- Peace Corps Health Volunteer Ian Hennessee

Malaria is an incredibly deadly, pervasive disease. It kills between 750,000 to 1.2 million people every year, mostly children and pregnant women.

When you really see it at the local level, though, its real impact becomes clear. In my host family alone every single child had malaria last year at least once, some three or four times. It exacts an extraordinarily heavy toll on the health, productivity, and finances of the village, and nearly every family has lost children to the disease.

Prevention work can have incredibly positive effect on the well being of these families. Simple interventions like bed nets, indoor residual spraying and prompt treatment can save huge amounts of money, time and ultimately lives.

- Peace Corps Health Volunteer Ian Hennessee

Malaria Stomp Out Malaria health youth child mortality Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteer

I’m starting to work on a Bed Net Distribution and Installation Campaign. My plan is have trainings/demonstrations to heads of households in the rural areas we visit on how to install the nets, then give them a net and check-sheet of how to do it and send them on their way. A week or so later we pop back in to inspect how it went. This plan is a bit stalled right now as we’re waiting for the seasonal shipment of nets to come in for distribution.

 Until new nets are available, I have been working in the rural areas with a local Health Extension Worker on installations of preexisting nets. This means sewing up holes, attempting to reinstall crazily hung nets, and just trying to keep my chin up.

Peace Corps Volunteer Jean DeMarco

(Source: lethiopiah.wordpress.com)

World Malaria Day Ethiopia malaria Stomping Out Malaria Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteer

Peace Corps Volunteers worldwide commemorate Global Youth Service Day by working with children, youth and young adults to be more active citizens in their communities. This year, many Volunteers are using Global Youth Service Day activities to promote environmental awareness on Earth Day. 

Observed April 20 to 22, Global Youth Service Day provides Volunteers with an opportunity to engage youth and local community members in long-term service projects. For more than 10 years, Peace Corps Volunteers and their community partners have celebrated Global Youth Service Day and Earth Day through various activities.

Throughout the year, Peace Corps Volunteers work with youth to foster skills for transitioning from school to work, and becoming engaged in their communities. Volunteers also develop extracurricular activities that help local youth build confidence and develop decision-making, communication and leadership skills that promote positive relationships with peers, parents and adults. 

Five percent of Peace Corps Volunteers work in the youth in community development sector as their primary assignment, while another 40 percent of Volunteers work in the education sector. 

(Source: go.usa.gov)

Global Youth Service Day youth youth development community development volunteering Peace Corps Volunteer public service environment Peace Corps

Peace Corps Volunteer Simon Williams is working with his Ukrainian village to build a community athletic field and create a soccer league for the local school. Williams, who played baseball professionally with the St. Louis Cardinals organization, says the current athletic field at the village school is inadequate. 

“The school sits on top of a hill and the field that they have is the size of half a basketball court, which is not sufficient for most physical education activities,” he explains. “Having been active in athletics my whole life, and knowing how soccer-crazy all these kids are, it would be great to see them have an adequate place to play.

“The plan is to make this a very hands-on project,” says the University of Maine graduate, who was Captain of the UMaine baseball team. “The village and its people have very little money but are excited to be a part of building a soccer field for the school.”

Williams has been working as a Youth Development volunteer since 2011, teaching English to students in a Kindergarten through 11th grade school. “We are playing stick-ball and the kids love it. I cut down a broom handle, bought a tennis ball and made the bases out of rocks and they are beginning to grasp the basics. The students always try for a home run, which is hilarious. I like their hustle,” he adds.

In order to receive funding through the Peace Corps Partnership Program, a community must make a 25 percent contribution to the total project cost and outline success indicators for the individual projects. This helps ensure community ownership and a greater chance of long-term sustainability.

One hundred percent of each tax-deductible PCPP donation goes toward a development project. Support Williams’ project in Ukraine

(Source: details for https)

Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteer baseball st. louis cardinals soccer sports Peace Corps Partnership Program Ukraine Eastern Europe youth

stompoutmalaria:

Weekly Awesome, Burkina Faso: The “Fight Against Malaria” Song with PCV Sara Goodman

PCV Sara Goodman is Non-Formal Education Volunteer posted in Burkina Faso who serves on Peace Corps Burkina Faso’s Community Health and AIDS Task-force, a group charged with promoting malaria prevention and treatment activities among the volunteer community.  In addition to being an awesome volunteer and health promoter, Sara is also quite the musician, having studied Instrumental Music Education at the University of Illinois.  To engage volunteers and communities in the fight against malaria Sara created this music video for the parody song “Lutter Contre Palu*.”  Check out the lyrics below and sing along!


“Lutter Contre Palu” Lyrics

C’est la faut des moustiques qui causent le palu

Trop des piqures ça va fait mal

C’est un maladie qui est endémique

Ici au Burkina et partout l’Afrique

Est-ce-que c’est mieux ou c’est le pire

Il faut que nous allons decrire

Qu’est ce que vous pouvez faire pour prevenir

Est-ce-que c’est mieux ou c’est le pire

Il faut que nous allons decrire

Qu’est ce que vous pouvez faire pour prevenir

 

Il faut dormir sous un moustiquaire

Qui est très bien attaché

Il faut utiliser le pommade de neem

Après laver et avant dormir

Il faut lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, contre palu

Il faut lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, contre palu

Il faut lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, contre palu

Parce que ça va sauvegarder beaucoup des vies

 

Si vous aller dormir dehors ce soir

Il faut être protéger

Attacher le moustiquaire parmi les arbres

Et vous pouvez dormir sans les piqures

 

Si vous avez froid il faut faire attention

Si vous avez aussi le fievre

Il faut vous vous emballez dans un pagne mouiller

Et allez immediatement au dispensaire

 

Est-ce-que c’est mieux ou c’est le pire

Il faut que nous allons decrire

Qu’est ce que vous pouvez faire pour prevenir

Il faut lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, contre palu

Il faut lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, contre palu

Il faut lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, contre palu

Parce que ça va sauvegarder beaucoup des vies

 

*this parody song is in compliance with the fair-use clause in U.S copyright law.

 

reblog Peace Corps Volunteer malaria Burkino Faso music Africa education health HIV AIDS

Peace Corps Volunteer Tackles a Sensitive Women’s Health Problem in Uganda

When Stacey Frankenstein-Markon discovered that girls in Uganda often used rags, old socks or wads of newspapers to do the job of sanitary napkins, she was shocked. She was even more horrified to realize that purchasing commercial pads was an impossible dream for most of them, since they come from families of subsistence farmers making about $1 a day in disposable income. 

“Disposable pads cost $1 for an 8-pack,” says the 25-year-old Peace Corps Volunteer, who with her husband, Tony Markon, is serving in Uganda as part of Michigan Technological University’s Peace Corps Master’s International (PCMI) program in applied science education. “If a family has three daughters who need pads, that family would have to spend 20 percent of their income just on menstrual pads. Who can afford to do that?”

The pad problem also was leading girls to stay away from school, fearing that they might stain their clothes and be badgered by boys, Frankenstein-Markon said.  Eventually, they fall so far behind that they have to drop out. 

But thanks to the inventiveness of another Peace Corps Volunteer who had served in the eastern Ugandan region just before the Markons got there in 2010, the Michigan Tech student has been able to help hundreds of girls practice better hygiene while they learn about menstruation, their bodies and women’s health.  And not incidentally, stay in school. 

(Source: mtu.edu)

Africa Master's International Peace Corps Volunteer Peace corps Uganda gender gender inequality health hygenie menstruation reproductive health sanitary napkins women's health Michigan Tech graduate school grad school


Mouhou Boussine, my counterpart, and I are sitting amongst her drying roses in the Valley of the Roses in Morocco. As a small business development Volunteer, I helped Mouhou develop the weaving association in the village. The weavers were all agrarian farmers and every spring, we woke at dawn to harvest roses which we often cooked into rosewater.

- Peace Corps Business Development Volunteer Terra Fuller

Mouhou Boussine, my counterpart, and I are sitting amongst her drying roses in the Valley of the Roses in Morocco. As a small business development Volunteer, I helped Mouhou develop the weaving association in the village. The weavers were all agrarian farmers and every spring, we woke at dawn to harvest roses which we often cooked into rosewater.

- Peace Corps Business Development Volunteer Terra Fuller

(Source: peacecorps.gov)

spring Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteer host country national counterparts flowers roses small business Morocco Middle East Valley of the Roses rosewater

weweretiredofbeingmild:

My first Qunioa seeds are growing!

They scared me, they were planted a month ago and then nothing… but sure enough, tiny green life!

—This is a little project I’m working on with my friend Zoë, I gave about a teaspoon of Quinoa seeds to 8 families in my village and asked them to try growing them. The real goal is that people would be willing to eat this as a part of their regular diet, because its chocked full of protein and nutrients that aren’t a part of their regular diets. I’ll let you know how it turns out in about 5 months.

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lwsiv:

 
For three weeks during the winter school break another volunteer and myself ran a youth-camp.  There were approximately 24 kids, between the ages of 7-12, with a roughly even percentage of boys and girls.  We met every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday between the hours of 9-12pm for a total of 9 sessions. 
The cross-sector camp was a collaboration between the Health and Business sector in the department of Rivas. Covered topics included:  HIV/AIDS awareness, Gender Roles in Society, Self-esteem, Communication, Manualidades, Decision Making, Planning for the future, Leadership, and Creativity.  
súper vacaciones campamento
10 de febrero de 2012 - San Jorge, Rivas 

lwsiv:

For three weeks during the winter school break another volunteer and myself ran a youth-camp.  There were approximately 24 kids, between the ages of 7-12, with a roughly even percentage of boys and girls.  We met every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday between the hours of 9-12pm for a total of 9 sessions. 

The cross-sector camp was a collaboration between the Health and Business sector in the department of Rivas. Covered topics included:  HIV/AIDS awareness, Gender Roles in Society, Self-esteem, Communication, Manualidades, Decision Making, Planning for the future, Leadership, and Creativity.  

súper vacaciones campamento

10 de febrero de 2012 - San Jorge, Rivas 

Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteer reblogs youth health HIV/AIDS gender communications leadership creativity