Who was Franklin H. Williams?

For those even slightly familiar with Peace Corps history, you’ve almost definitely heard about Sargent Shriver, the first agency Director and the person credited right after President Kennedy with the agency’s founding.
Lesser known but equally due founding credit is Franklin H. Williams (above left, with Shriver), an African American civil rights lawyer, diplomat and foundation president who worked to improve interracial relations in the U.S. He joined Director Shriver as his Special Assistant in 1961 and later became the agency’s Africa Regional Director.
Williams’s career was illustrious before and after Peace Corps. He began his law career at the NAACP, first as assistant special counsel to Thurgood Marshall, where he argued cases before the Supreme Court, and later as the West Coast Regional Director. At the NAACP Williams conducted drives for legislation on minority employment and won the first judgment in a case involving school desegregation. As Assistant Attorney General in California, he created the state’s first Constitutional Rights Section within the Department of Justice. After serving on Peace Corps staff, Williams served as Ambassador to Ghana in the administration of President Johnson, and from 1970 to 1990 he served as the president of the Phelps-Stokes Fund, an organization established to enhance educational opportunities for Africans, African Americans and American Indians.

Who was Franklin H. Williams?

For those even slightly familiar with Peace Corps history, you’ve almost definitely heard about Sargent Shriver, the first agency Director and the person credited right after President Kennedy with the agency’s founding.

Lesser known but equally due founding credit is Franklin H. Williams (above left, with Shriver), an African American civil rights lawyer, diplomat and foundation president who worked to improve interracial relations in the U.S. He joined Director Shriver as his Special Assistant in 1961 and later became the agency’s Africa Regional Director.

Williams’s career was illustrious before and after Peace Corps. He began his law career at the NAACP, first as assistant special counsel to Thurgood Marshall, where he argued cases before the Supreme Court, and later as the West Coast Regional Director. At the NAACP Williams conducted drives for legislation on minority employment and won the first judgment in a case involving school desegregation. As Assistant Attorney General in California, he created the state’s first Constitutional Rights Section within the Department of Justice. After serving on Peace Corps staff, Williams served as Ambassador to Ghana in the administration of President Johnson, and from 1970 to 1990 he served as the president of the Phelps-Stokes Fund, an organization established to enhance educational opportunities for Africans, African Americans and American Indians.

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Take my picture

mindatlarge:

image

What you see in this picture comes from a place where the road surrenders to the earth.

What you see in this picture is the reason I traveled 6,400 miles.

What you see in this picture is the reason I am learning to speak another language.

What you see in this picture is braver than you or I.

What you see in this picture could have been you or I.

What you see in this picture is a girl who will learn to tend her own garden and avoid malnutrition.

What you see in this picture is the reason I will not leave Africa.

This picture is so many things, but it was made possible because you were a great friend, teacher, farmer, or family member that believed in me.

This picture

is for you.

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instagram:

Scenes from Small-Town Uganda with @sarahgenelle

For a look at everyday life on a coffee farm in Western Uganda, follow @sarahgenelle.

Living and working on a coffee farm nestled in the foothills of the Rwenzori Mountains in Uganda is just the latest stop in the nomadic life of Sarah Castagnola (@sarahgenelle).

Sarah’s parents taught at international schools, which meant relocating the family to a different country every few years. “When I moved to Oregon for university I was exited to put down roots,” she explains. “However, it was only a matter of time before I yearned to travel again.”

Sarah’s studies and work in micro-finance have taken her across the globe, and, in April of 2013, she accepted a Peace Corps assignment in the small Ugandan village of Kyarumba. Living and working in Uganda often means it’s easier to share a photo on Instagram than it is to find running water or electricity. “This is the paradox of living in a developing country,” Sarah says. “Cellphones are ubiquitous, however women and children spend hours each day fetching water.”

Sarah, who plans to continue traveling after the Peace Corps, hopes her photos educate and inspire: “Opportunities happen when you take risks and follow your passion.”

Congrats on being featured by Instagram, Sarah!

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The Peace Corps Office of Diversity and National Outreach is hosting a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signing ceremony, celebrating our relationship with Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity on Friday, May 23.Join us in person at Peace Corps HQ or watch the Google+ Hangout On Air http://bit.ly/1qmqZFEThe event will highlight the intersection of the organizational missions and showcase the effect and impact that Peace Corps service has had on brothers of Alpha Phi Alpha.  The inaugural event for this partnership will also honor the legacy of Alpha Phi Alpha brothers in the Peace Corps and foreign affairs.  The event also aims to call to action future generations interested in engaging the global community through service. Guests will include will include Mark Tillman, General President of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. and Johnnie Carson, Former Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs and Returned Peace Corps Volunteer. In addition, we will virtually connect with a currently serving Peace Corps Volunteer (Namibia) and brother of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

The Peace Corps Office of Diversity and National Outreach is hosting a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signing ceremony, celebrating our relationship with Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity on Friday, May 23.

Join us in person at Peace Corps HQ or watch the Google+ Hangout On Air http://bit.ly/1qmqZFE

The event will highlight the intersection of the organizational missions and showcase the effect and impact that Peace Corps service has had on brothers of Alpha Phi Alpha.  The inaugural event for this partnership will also honor the legacy of Alpha Phi Alpha brothers in the Peace Corps and foreign affairs.  The event also aims to call to action future generations interested in engaging the global community through service. Guests will include will include Mark Tillman, General President of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. and Johnnie Carson, Former Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs and Returned Peace Corps Volunteer. In addition, we will virtually connect with a currently serving Peace Corps Volunteer (Namibia) and brother of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

Alpha Phi Alpha Peace Corps fraternity

rebeccaandwill:

Since we got our kitchen in order, it has been really nice to be able to cook our own meals. It feels good when we’re able to recreate favorites from home, or when we’re able to secure good vegetables from nice people on the island. Man, how it’s nice to get some tomatoes and leafy greens in the mix! This chronological assortment of photos gives you a sense of how our cooking has progressed: from pasta, to grilled sausages, to fresh salads, to our favorite so far—pizza!

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catherinelampi23:

Well this weekend I had another déjà vu moment in the campo, when my life felt exactly like an episode of The Simple Life. Another day, another 5:00 am wake up call. This time, my host dad and brother took me to learn how to herd and milk cows. Now, on my resume under special skills I can put expert at killing chickens and milking cows. Basically, post Peace Corps I am going to be ready to start my career as a farm hand, maybe assistant farm hand. I was, as usual, in for a few surprises on this little outing. First I discovered that milking cows is not as easy as it looks on tv. It took me three times, and three different cows, to finally get it. I also assumed that the family had one maybe two cows and that this little outing would last no more than a half hour and then I could go back to bed. Wrong. 15 cows and two and a half hours later we were done. I really should never assume anything here, since I am always wrong.  My favorite part of these early morning outings is getting the chance to watch the sun rise over the rolling hills of San Nicolas- something you miss out on when you wake up at 8:30am. I don’t know if this scenery will ever get old. It is also really nice to spend time bonding with my host family outside of the house. They always get a kick out of teaching me how to do something new, and it is nice to interact with my host dad out side of the ADESCO/ Peace Corps realm. Everyday I am starting to feel more at home here and more so apart of the family. It truly is the people that make a place, and I feel fortunate to have such welcoming and warm people to work and live with for the next two years.

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