miiikehawkins:

The preparations for drinking “stone ground” kava in Lekavatmel Village, Central Pentecost island, Vanuatu.

There are several different ways to prepare kava, many places simply use a Chinese made meat grinder.  The grinder is very efficient but lacks any “character”.  Stone ground kava is much more labor intensive, makes less kava to drink but the shells served with ground and hand mashed has a different flavor, and a much thicker constancy.  This combined with the freshly pulled kava from Pentecost created a great kava high when drunk.

kava vanuatu island life pcv stone ground village nakamal village life peace corps reblogs

Meet the Peace Cars! Over the next two weeks, cars will be traveling from Peace Corps headquarters in D.C. to Atlanta, Los Angeles (via Chicago and Denver), and one will be traveling around the D.C. Metro area. Share your photo of the #PeaceCars and tell us why you’re interested in service.
http://bit.ly/1qshsru

Meet the Peace Cars! Over the next two weeks, cars will be traveling from Peace Corps headquarters in D.C. to Atlanta, Los Angeles (via Chicago and Denver), and one will be traveling around the D.C. Metro area. Share your photo of the #PeaceCars and tell us why you’re interested in service.

http://bit.ly/1qshsru

Peace Corps Peace Cars

We asked returned Volunteers how their service prepared them for their careers today. From interpersonal skills, to language and sector skills, Volunteers gained unique working experiences in different cultures around the world that they brought back and make them successful in their careers today.  Are you ready to serve? #RPCVcareers http://1.usa.gov/Yd8dnK

We asked returned Volunteers how their service prepared them for their careers today. From interpersonal skills, to language and sector skills, Volunteers gained unique working experiences in different cultures around the world that they brought back and make them successful in their careers today.  Are you ready to serve? #RPCVcareers http://1.usa.gov/Yd8dnK

Peace Corps infographic RPCV RPCVcareers

zanyinzambia:

One day a GIANT stick bug fell out of my roof. How cool is that?! It climbed right back up the wall, except for a brief stint where I tried to pick it up. Did you know stick bugs have wings? I did not, and it sure did give me a start! They can’t really fly as their wings are disproportionately small to their bodies but it does let them glide or rather fall gracefully from predators or overly curious Peace Corps volunteers. After that I left it alone and it is probably still living in my roof. I mean, I can’t tell since it’s a stick bug and my roof is made of sticks but I don’t see why it would want to leave.

OH MAN, WHAT IF MY ROOF IS REALLY JUST MADE OF STICK BUGS AND I DON’T EVEN KNOW? Definitely a possibility.

stick bug zambia africa camouflage peace corps reblogs

Who was Franklin H. Williams?

For those even slightly familiar with Peace Corps history, you’ve almost definitely heard about Sargent Shriver, the first agency Director and the person credited right after President Kennedy with the agency’s founding.
Lesser known but equally due founding credit is Franklin H. Williams (above left, with Shriver), an African American civil rights lawyer, diplomat and foundation president who worked to improve interracial relations in the U.S. He joined Director Shriver as his Special Assistant in 1961 and later became the agency’s Africa Regional Director.
Williams’s career was illustrious before and after Peace Corps. He began his law career at the NAACP, first as assistant special counsel to Thurgood Marshall, where he argued cases before the Supreme Court, and later as the West Coast Regional Director. At the NAACP Williams conducted drives for legislation on minority employment and won the first judgment in a case involving school desegregation. As Assistant Attorney General in California, he created the state’s first Constitutional Rights Section within the Department of Justice. After serving on Peace Corps staff, Williams served as Ambassador to Ghana in the administration of President Johnson, and from 1970 to 1990 he served as the president of the Phelps-Stokes Fund, an organization established to enhance educational opportunities for Africans, African Americans and American Indians.

Who was Franklin H. Williams?

For those even slightly familiar with Peace Corps history, you’ve almost definitely heard about Sargent Shriver, the first agency Director and the person credited right after President Kennedy with the agency’s founding.

Lesser known but equally due founding credit is Franklin H. Williams (above left, with Shriver), an African American civil rights lawyer, diplomat and foundation president who worked to improve interracial relations in the U.S. He joined Director Shriver as his Special Assistant in 1961 and later became the agency’s Africa Regional Director.

Williams’s career was illustrious before and after Peace Corps. He began his law career at the NAACP, first as assistant special counsel to Thurgood Marshall, where he argued cases before the Supreme Court, and later as the West Coast Regional Director. At the NAACP Williams conducted drives for legislation on minority employment and won the first judgment in a case involving school desegregation. As Assistant Attorney General in California, he created the state’s first Constitutional Rights Section within the Department of Justice. After serving on Peace Corps staff, Williams served as Ambassador to Ghana in the administration of President Johnson, and from 1970 to 1990 he served as the president of the Phelps-Stokes Fund, an organization established to enhance educational opportunities for Africans, African Americans and American Indians.

history diversity NAACP African American History Peace Corps

Take my picture

mindatlarge:

image

What you see in this picture comes from a place where the road surrenders to the earth.

What you see in this picture is the reason I traveled 6,400 miles.

What you see in this picture is the reason I am learning to speak another language.

What you see in this picture is braver than you or I.

What you see in this picture could have been you or I.

What you see in this picture is a girl who will learn to tend her own garden and avoid malnutrition.

What you see in this picture is the reason I will not leave Africa.

This picture is so many things, but it was made possible because you were a great friend, teacher, farmer, or family member that believed in me.

This picture

is for you.

africa gambia peace corps reblogs peace corps volunteers

instagram:

Scenes from Small-Town Uganda with @sarahgenelle

For a look at everyday life on a coffee farm in Western Uganda, follow @sarahgenelle.

Living and working on a coffee farm nestled in the foothills of the Rwenzori Mountains in Uganda is just the latest stop in the nomadic life of Sarah Castagnola (@sarahgenelle).

Sarah’s parents taught at international schools, which meant relocating the family to a different country every few years. “When I moved to Oregon for university I was exited to put down roots,” she explains. “However, it was only a matter of time before I yearned to travel again.”

Sarah’s studies and work in micro-finance have taken her across the globe, and, in April of 2013, she accepted a Peace Corps assignment in the small Ugandan village of Kyarumba. Living and working in Uganda often means it’s easier to share a photo on Instagram than it is to find running water or electricity. “This is the paradox of living in a developing country,” Sarah says. “Cellphones are ubiquitous, however women and children spend hours each day fetching water.”

Sarah, who plans to continue traveling after the Peace Corps, hopes her photos educate and inspire: “Opportunities happen when you take risks and follow your passion.”

Congrats on being featured by Instagram, Sarah!

Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteer Instagram food education Uganda coffee reblogs