Peace Corps Response Volunteer M. Thomas Dugganis working with the Millennium Challenge Corporation to rehabilitate essential community facilities in the Philippines after the devastation of Typhoon Haiyan. 

He’s also using his educational background in visual arts, camera equipment, and knowledge of local dialects and geography he acquired during his three years of service to capture the experiences of Filipinos and share it with those who need to understand the damage and the affected people.

See more of his photos here 

Haiyan Philippines photography Peace Corps Response

"The photo shows the owner of the home we stayed in for the two years of our Peace Corps service. My parents sent me the Mad magazine and I shared it with him. I don’t know that he understood the humor of Mad, but he seemed interested. The photo was taken in the yard of the home we lived in looking north toward the volcano Kanlaon from which the town gets its name." - Peace Corps Volunteer Richard Johnsen (Philippines - 1964) #madmagazine #funny #Asia #Philippines #peacecorps #culture #culturalexchange #throwbackthursday #tbt #1960s

"The photo shows the owner of the home we stayed in for the two years of our Peace Corps service. My parents sent me the Mad magazine and I shared it with him. I don’t know that he understood the humor of Mad, but he seemed interested. The photo was taken in the yard of the home we lived in looking north toward the volcano Kanlaon from which the town gets its name." - Peace Corps Volunteer Richard Johnsen (Philippines - 1964) #madmagazine #funny #Asia #Philippines #peacecorps #culture #culturalexchange #throwbackthursday #tbt #1960s

funny culturalexchange throwbackthursday madmagazine philippines tbt asia culture 1960s peacecorps

During her service, Peace Corps Volunteer Rachael Saler taught Filipino women to crochet discarded plastic bags into colorful handbags and change purses as a way to engage local communities in business ventures, and teach environmental awareness and recycling. Since the Bag-O Plastic project launched in August 2010, more than 100 women from Bago City in the Philippines have sold 200 bags, earning 63,000 pesos (about $1,500).

For each bag that is sold, the woman who crocheted it receives 80 percent of the earnings. The other 20 percent goes toward the purchasing of zipper, runners, tags, etc. Each woman collects, segregates and washes plastic bags to be crocheted and sold. Women have also begun exchanging plastic bags for rice with other merchants and started plastic-bag collection bins in local commercial areas.

Rachael, who holds a master’s degree from Columbia University and a bachelor’s from Syracuse University, credits her mother for the Bag-O Plastic idea. When her parents visited in 2009, Saler’s mother told her to consider crocheting recycled plastic bags into handbags. Rachael was so inspired by the project she extended her Peace Corps service for a third year to continue it. She completed her Peace Corps service in December 2011.

Philippines recyling artisans environment small business development Gender empowerment fashion purses Columbia University Syracuse University


Taken after a week long training on HIV/AIDS and behavior change communication, this photo features all participants and facilitators, both Peace Corps Volunteers and Filipino counterparts.
Those attending the training organized themselves in the shape of ribbon, with a red glow from the candles and sent a framed copy as a gift of thanks to Jake, the person living with AIDS who gave his testimonial during the training.

Peace Corps Youth Development Volunteer Blake Van Fleteren 

Taken after a week long training on HIV/AIDS and behavior change communication, this photo features all participants and facilitators, both Peace Corps Volunteers and Filipino counterparts.

Those attending the training organized themselves in the shape of ribbon, with a red glow from the candles and sent a framed copy as a gift of thanks to Jake, the person living with AIDS who gave his testimonial during the training.

Peace Corps Youth Development Volunteer Blake Van Fleteren 

Philippines Asia World AIDS Day HIV AIDS PLWH behavior change red ribbon

This photo was taken after a week-long training of trainers on the topic of HIV/AIDS and behavior change communication in the Philippines, which included interviews of local sex workers, and a testimonial from a person living with HIV.  
Peace Corps Youth Development Volunteer Blake Van Fleteren, one of the facilitators of the training, lighting the last candle to complete the red ribbon. 

This photo was taken after a week-long training of trainers on the topic of HIV/AIDS and behavior change communication in the Philippines, which included interviews of local sex workers, and a testimonial from a person living with HIV.  

Peace Corps Youth Development Volunteer Blake Van Fleteren, one of the facilitators of the training, lighting the last candle to complete the red ribbon. 

Philippines Asia World AIDS Day PLWH sex workers red ribbon HIV AIDS