graceoverseas:

GUYS. The secret everyone has been keeping from you for the last 24 years is that aged, salted eggs taste exactly like cheese! Okay, maybe not exactly, but certainly more than the plastic wrapped ‘American cheese’ slices they sell at 711. Go forth and gin kai kem, my friends

graceoverseas:

GUYS. The secret everyone has been keeping from you for the last 24 years is that aged, salted eggs taste exactly like cheese! Okay, maybe not exactly, but certainly more than the plastic wrapped ‘American cheese’ slices they sell at 711. Go forth and gin kai kem, my friends

thailand food peace corps reblogs food fridays

"World peace must develop from inner peace. Peace is not just mere absence of violence. Peace is, I think, the manifestation of human compassion."
- The Dalai Lama (via lazyyogi)

(Source: lazyyogi)

reblogs quotes peace

phylasophy:

In all corners of the globe, “girl power” is a potent idea that has been transforming societies for many generations. From the economy to public health, female empowerment is a key element in the progression and evolution of any developing society. For this reason, Peace Corps has made Gender and Development a worldwide initiative. Camp GLOW (Girls Leading Our World) is a camp that has been held internationally in Peace Corps countries, and February 2014 will mark the third year it is held in Paraguay. Camp GLOW Paraguay includes motivational speakers, engaging activities on sexual education, self-expression, creativity, goal setting, value formation, gender roles and personal identity. With your support, our dream to fund Camp GLOW 2014 can turn into reality for this year’s motivated participants! Please unite with us in the movement towards female empowerment in Paraguay! To donate, click on the link below! Thank you for joining the cause!

http://tinyurl.com/qg3j8qz

Paraguay South America girls GIRL RISING PEACE 2013 2014 girl power feminist peace corps reblogs Camp GLOW

Some people start their mornings with coffee

emilybecker01:

I woke up this morning at the normal time to which I allow myself to sleep when I don’t have to teach in the morning, around 8 a.m.

By this time, all the students are already at school, which means, for a few moments, my neighborhood is relatively quiet.

This morning, though, as I was in my kitchen heating up water for tea, I heard people outside my neighbor’s house. She’s a nice lady and makes her living usually by being a tailor. In the past few months, she’s also started selling the local moonshine out of her house. For 100 CFA, men come by, take a shot of sodabe and then ride off on their motorcycles, rarely staying more than 5 minutes. One of my favorite nighttime activities is to sit on my front porch and watch how many of the men who stop by I recognize, either as colleagues or the father of one of my students.

When I came back from vacation three days ago, a small hut with benches and tables had been erected outside her house, I guessed in an effort to expand her business, at least expand it out of her living room. And business has expanded, the area outside my front door becoming less like a front porch and more like the street outside a bar, but besides moto horns and loud voices, there haven’t been any real complaints.

And so, this morning, as I sipped my Harney & Son’s Tower of London tea, I silently toasted the men taking shots of sodabe next door at 8:30 in the morning. 

Peace Corps volunteer Benin Africa mornings moonshine peace corps reblogs

malawhee:

Today my ANAMED Club (Action for Natural Medicine) was interviewed by a radio journalist!

The organization NASFAM (which is something about helping Small Farmers of Malawi) has a branch in our village that has been supporting our club. With their donation of seeds and tubes we’ve planted about 4,000(!) tree seedlings for our school and community. The seedlings pictured are moringa which is an amazingly nutritional plant. So the reporter came and spoke to all the students about what we’re doing and why, and next Saturday we have a 30 min program on radio 1! It was all in Chichewa (hence my strained face trying to scramble up some words) but I could tell my students did an amazing job and I’m so proud of the work this club has done.

Malawi planting trees ANAMED NASFAM development peace corps reblogs peace corps volunteers