united-nations:


Message from Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon: “This year’s commemoration of Nelson Mandela International Day comes at a moment of deep reflection on the life and work of Madiba, as the universally revered leader remains in the hospital.”  Ideas for how you can take action and inspire change are here:http://j.mp/jzCBwS Share this image to say you stand for freedom, justice and democracy.

united-nations:

Message from Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon: “This year’s commemoration of Nelson Mandela International Day comes at a moment of deep reflection on the life and work of Madiba, as the universally revered leader remains in the hospital.”

Ideas for how you can take action and inspire change are here:
http://j.mp/jzCBwS

Share this image to say you stand for freedom, justice and democracy.

United Nations Nelson Mandela South Africa Africa

malawhee:

It’s my One Year anniversary in Malawi!
I’m studying this photo of my group that was taken right when we got off the plane. These fresh young faces you see here have really transformed over the past year. And it’s not just that we’ve lost weight, gained a tan, and grown our hair out… the experience itself has aged us. We’ve grown stronger, wiser, more patient… and there’s a visible difference. These people who were strangers to me at the time this photo was taken have become my family, and there’s no way I could have made it this far without them.
It’s amazing how much has happened in a year, how much I’ve learned. I’m eager and optimistic for what the next year of service will bring.

malawhee:

It’s my One Year anniversary in Malawi!

I’m studying this photo of my group that was taken right when we got off the plane. These fresh young faces you see here have really transformed over the past year. And it’s not just that we’ve lost weight, gained a tan, and grown our hair out… the experience itself has aged us. We’ve grown stronger, wiser, more patient… and there’s a visible difference. These people who were strangers to me at the time this photo was taken have become my family, and there’s no way I could have made it this far without them.

It’s amazing how much has happened in a year, how much I’ve learned. I’m eager and optimistic for what the next year of service will bring.

Malawi peace corps africa peace corps volunteers reblog

In her first two years while living in Amparafaravola which is located in the Lac Alaotra region of Madagascar, Peace Corps Volunteer Teena Curry worked with a youth group to paint a mural depicting the malaria transmission cycle and the importance of sustained LLIN use. By the end of the event, 15 members of the youth group were trained in explaining the importance of LLIN use and how to properly care for mosquito nets and one or two performed sensitizations to community members while the others painted. The painting of the mural was combined with other community education events during the week of World Malaria Day including two neem cream demonstrations and wall of fame project that featured photos of families who hung their net correctly and self-reported having slept under it every night. Other secondary projects during her first two years of service included preparing the curriculum for a behavior change communication training for 16 community health workers which included techniques for behavior change messages related to malaria prevention activities.
That’s just a few things that Teena did as a PCV from 2010 – 2012, she extended her service until October 2013. Read more about her here!

In her first two years while living in Amparafaravola which is located in the Lac Alaotra region of Madagascar, Peace Corps Volunteer Teena Curry worked with a youth group to paint a mural depicting the malaria transmission cycle and the importance of sustained LLIN use. By the end of the event, 15 members of the youth group were trained in explaining the importance of LLIN use and how to properly care for mosquito nets and one or two performed sensitizations to community members while the others painted. The painting of the mural was combined with other community education events during the week of World Malaria Day including two neem cream demonstrations and wall of fame project that featured photos of families who hung their net correctly and self-reported having slept under it every night. Other secondary projects during her first two years of service included preparing the curriculum for a behavior change communication training for 16 community health workers which included techniques for behavior change messages related to malaria prevention activities.

That’s just a few things that Teena did as a PCV from 2010 – 2012, she extended her service until October 2013. Read more about her here!

(Source: stompoutmalaria.org)

Madagascar Africa global health malaria Peace Corps Volunteer malaria prevention behavior change commmunuty health

I <3 maps and you will too!

malawhee:

I taught my Form One’s their first geography lesson today. I’m not sure if they learned geography in primary school, so maybe it was their first geography lesson ever.

To start, I had them draw a map of the world in their exercise books. The results were… interesting. Haha. I mean, they don’t see images constantly like kids growing up in America do… they don’t watch TV, they have limited textbooks, etc. So most of them didn’t really know what it was supposed to look like. Some of them just drew a map of Malawi, which I thought was interesting.

Anyway, one popular Peace Corps activity undertaken by volunteers is the World Map Project. I am definitely going to try and do this at my school with my new geography students. By the end of this term these kids will KNOW that America is not in Europe.

image

Peace Corps Volunteer Malawi Africa geography maps education school youth reblogs

Not too long ago, Margaret Banda’s daughter had a dangerous rendezvous with malaria. Her newborn twins waited at home for her as she was rushed to the hospital with a high fever. Since then, Margaret has completed ANAMED (Action for Natural Medicine) training. Here, she is pounding morgina leaves into a powder for cooking which is essential when battling disease and infection.

Not too long ago, Margaret Banda’s daughter had a dangerous rendezvous with malaria. Her newborn twins waited at home for her as she was rushed to the hospital with a high fever. Since then, Margaret has completed ANAMED (Action for Natural Medicine) training. Here, she is pounding morgina leaves into a powder for cooking which is essential when battling disease and infection.

natural medicine World Malaria Day malaria malaria prevention global health Malawi Africa

In honor of Malaria Month, 20 Peace Corps Volunteers from Sierra Leone rode their bicycles 55 miles, from Kamakwie to Panlap, as part of the Stomp Out Malaria Initiative. They stopped at villages along the way and did activities aimed at improving the villagers’ knowledge of malaria transmission, prevention, and treatment. To help spread the message, the volunteers wrote malaria-related slogans on white t-shirts.

In honor of Malaria Month, 20 Peace Corps Volunteers from Sierra Leone rode their bicycles 55 miles, from Kamakwie to Panlap, as part of the Stomp Out Malaria Initiative. They stopped at villages along the way and did activities aimed at improving the villagers’ knowledge of malaria transmission, prevention, and treatment. To help spread the message, the volunteers wrote malaria-related slogans on white t-shirts.

World Malaria Day malaria prevention Sierra Leone Africa global health