"This mother was one of the first women in my village to receive PMTC (Preventing Mother to Child Transmission) treatments. She is HIV positive and her baby Ausi Bonolo was born HIV negative. This photo was taken in a remote mountainous district of Lesotho, where over 23% of the population is infected with HIV/AIDS. With the increase health care opportunities in Lesotho, help of HIV support groups and village health care workers, Ausi Bonolo has a greater chance of growing up in an AIDS-free generation." - Peace Corps HIV/AIDS Volunteer Pamela Rogers

"This mother was one of the first women in my village to receive PMTC (Preventing Mother to Child Transmission) treatments. She is HIV positive and her baby Ausi Bonolo was born HIV negative. This photo was taken in a remote mountainous district of Lesotho, where over 23% of the population is infected with HIV/AIDS. With the increase health care opportunities in Lesotho, help of HIV support groups and village health care workers, Ausi Bonolo has a greater chance of growing up in an AIDS-free generation." - Peace Corps HIV/AIDS Volunteer Pamela Rogers

HIV AIDS Peace Corps health maternal health children youth Lesotho Africa health care AIDS-free generation Peace Corps Digital library PMTC AIDS2012

Every Child Deserves a 5th Birthday 

More than 7 million children will die this year before they reach their 5th birthday. That number is equivalent to the entire population of New York City. And, even more disturbing, most of these children will die from preventable causes.

At the same time, as a global community, we have made staggering progress in the reduction of child mortality. Over the last 50 years, child mortality has been reduced by 70%. This result is largely due to high-impact tools and interventions for child survival, notably new vaccines and more community health workers.

However, we must not let this progress hide the reality that more than 7 million children are at risk every year. In rich and poor countries alike, the poorest and most disadvantaged children continue to miss out on lifesaving, affordable interventions.

The tremendous declines in child mortality in Rwanda, (over 50%), and the 28% decline in both Tanzania and Ethiopia prove that these simple, cost-effective interventions can save lives. Now is the time for every nation to build on this proven success.

All governments and citizens are responsible for the survival of their most vulnerable children. Stakeholders in every country – from the government to civil society to the faith community to the private sector – are responsible for the survival of the world’s children. Their existing commitments as well as future commitments must be fulfilled.

Ending preventable child deaths is possible, if we all work together.

(Source: 5thbday.usaid.gov)

USAID child mortality health youth children

This photo was taken in a community in Nicaragua during the month of May in 2011. As a maternal and child health Volunteer in El Jícaro, I assisted the doctors that day with collecting HIV tests. We ate lunch at a woman’s house, and she had five children, all very close in age. Her home was made of adobe, and she cooked everything over an open flame. The kids ran around barefoot and naked, except for this little girl who was in a pink, ruffly dress. One of the doctors had given her a piece of candy, and she seemed to treasure the candy more than anything. She didn’t want to eat it; she only wanted to hold it in her tiny hands! I titled this photo “Chigüina” because this word is what the people in the campo of Nicaragua use when they’re children.
- Peace Corps Health Volunteer Natalie Woodrum 

This photo was taken in a community in Nicaragua during the month of May in 2011. As a maternal and child health Volunteer in El Jícaro, I assisted the doctors that day with collecting HIV tests. We ate lunch at a woman’s house, and she had five children, all very close in age. Her home was made of adobe, and she cooked everything over an open flame. The kids ran around barefoot and naked, except for this little girl who was in a pink, ruffly dress. One of the doctors had given her a piece of candy, and she seemed to treasure the candy more than anything. She didn’t want to eat it; she only wanted to hold it in her tiny hands! I titled this photo “Chigüina” because this word is what the people in the campo of Nicaragua use when they’re children.

- Peace Corps Health Volunteer Natalie Woodrum 

Central America nicaragua health children HIV/AIDS Peace Corps Peace Corps Digital Library

"I think these photos sum up the Peace Corps Aquaculture Program, in that by teaching people how to raise fish they are able to provide themselves with a sustainable protein source that can increase health."

Peace Corps Agriculture Volunteer Chris Kelly, who served in Zambia from 2001-2003, helped his community build these fish ponds to help introduce more protein into their diets. The child holding the fish is most likely suffering from Kwashiorkor Syndrome, which is a severe protein malnutrition that affects children.

(Source: collection.peacecorps.gov)

Zambia Africa current countries Peace Corps host country nationals youth nutrition farming agriculture malnutrition fish Peace Corps Digital Library Kwashiorkor Syndrome children Aquaculture