This photo was taken on August 2, 2009 with one of the several Window of Hope groups that I worked with in Namibia. Window of Hope is a UNICEF driven educational program made up of lifeskills and HIV/AIDS education workshops. We met twice a week for several hours to discuss things that many young students encounter throughout the world including self-esteem issues, gender issues, pregnancy and HIV/AIDS education. It was a safe-haven for students who could not speak openly due to traditional stigmas on feelings, and general fears or questions children have growing up in a rural hostel school. This group has just finished the program! - Peace Corps Education Volunteer Melissa Becci

This photo was taken on August 2, 2009 with one of the several Window of Hope groups that I worked with in Namibia. Window of Hope is a UNICEF driven educational program made up of lifeskills and HIV/AIDS education workshops. We met twice a week for several hours to discuss things that many young students encounter throughout the world including self-esteem issues, gender issues, pregnancy and HIV/AIDS education. It was a safe-haven for students who could not speak openly due to traditional stigmas on feelings, and general fears or questions children have growing up in a rural hostel school. This group has just finished the program! - Peace Corps Education Volunteer Melissa Becci

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The children in my village have taken me in at  their big sister, calling me “kakak” rather than my actual name. It’s  heart-warming. They love to take me to the sugarcane fields that  surround our village. They run with knifes, and it makes me nervous, but  it’s the norm here. Children run free here. I love this photograph  because I actually let Sylvie, a 9-year old with very sticky fingers  from the sugarcane juices, use my Canon SLR to take this. Whenever she  sees this photo, she proudly says “aku aku” or “mine mine”. 

Peace Corps Education Volunteer Elle Chang

The children in my village have taken me in at their big sister, calling me “kakak” rather than my actual name. It’s heart-warming. They love to take me to the sugarcane fields that surround our village. They run with knifes, and it makes me nervous, but it’s the norm here. Children run free here. I love this photograph because I actually let Sylvie, a 9-year old with very sticky fingers from the sugarcane juices, use my Canon SLR to take this. Whenever she sees this photo, she proudly says “aku aku” or “mine mine”. 

Peace Corps Education Volunteer Elle Chang

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This  is how I remember September 11th. I went on a school field trip with my  teachers and students to the ruins of Old Leon, Nicaragua. After the  field trip I was exhausted and hungry. I wanted to get home and make  tuna casserole. However, my neighbors were adamant that I watch the news  on their television. I acquiesced and found them watching a movie. I  kept watching and watching, waiting for the credits to roll across the  screen. They kept saying that this was real and happening in real life,  that this was no movie, that this was a great tragedy in my country and  for the world. After we understood what was going on, my teachers and  friends came to my house to check on me and my family in the States. I  had not felt so much love and concern before that moment. For me, this  picture evokes those memories of concern, love, and friendship. I like  to remember September 11th as this picture. 

Peace Corps Volunteer R Diehl, Nicaragua - 2001

This is how I remember September 11th. I went on a school field trip with my teachers and students to the ruins of Old Leon, Nicaragua. After the field trip I was exhausted and hungry. I wanted to get home and make tuna casserole. However, my neighbors were adamant that I watch the news on their television. I acquiesced and found them watching a movie. I kept watching and watching, waiting for the credits to roll across the screen. They kept saying that this was real and happening in real life, that this was no movie, that this was a great tragedy in my country and for the world. After we understood what was going on, my teachers and friends came to my house to check on me and my family in the States. I had not felt so much love and concern before that moment. For me, this picture evokes those memories of concern, love, and friendship. I like to remember September 11th as this picture. 

Peace Corps Volunteer R Diehl, Nicaragua - 2001

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