"I’m very proud of our Peace Corps Volunteers because they are standing up for the idea that every young woman can make a difference in her own life and in her community. And it is a great pleasure for me always, as I travel around the world, to meet Peace Corps Volunteers, who represent the great values and ideals of our nation."

- Secretary of State Hilary Clinton during her visit to a Camp GLOW (Girls Leading Our World) in Malawi run by Peace Corps Volunteers.  

(Source: go.usa.gov)

Africa Camp GLOW Hilary Clinton Malawi Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteers Secretary of State State Department gen dev gender chitenje diplomacy

Peace Corps Volunteers Caryn Steinbrecher and Leslie W. Stewart IV organized a youth leadership camp called “Super Vacaciones” in Nicaragua. Twenty-four kids, between the ages of 7-12, participated in the camp, which covered topics including: HIV/AIDS awareness, teenage pregnancy prevention, gender roles, self-esteem development, life skills planning, leadership, and creativity. The goal of the camp was to provide students with an intellectually stimulating environment, which incorporated physical, creative, and thought provoking activities.

youth Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteers Nicaragua camp HIV/AIDS health gender leadership creativity


Building a new home in rural Zambia takes a lot of time and effort. On May 30, 2008, in a small village in the Luapula province, much of the community helped to build a home of mud bricks and dried grass for a struggling family in the village. The photograph I took shows six women carrying pails of water from a nearby stream to the men who mix the water into mud to make new bricks and mortar.

- Peace Corps Agriculture Volunteer Jason Hays

Building a new home in rural Zambia takes a lot of time and effort. On May 30, 2008, in a small village in the Luapula province, much of the community helped to build a home of mud bricks and dried grass for a struggling family in the village. The photograph I took shows six women carrying pails of water from a nearby stream to the men who mix the water into mud to make new bricks and mortar.

- Peace Corps Agriculture Volunteer Jason Hays

peace corps Zambia Africa community community development construction agriculture gender women water home houses

Peace Corps Volunteer Teaches Students to Make Bread; Generate Income in Uganda

Peace Corps Volunteer Siong Ng recently spent two months teaching three teachers and 30 female students how to make bread to generate income for their community.

“We intend to be self-sufficient after the first school term by supporting the baking program with revenue from the sale of baked goods. Of course, we cannot bake bread without an oven. On one of the field trips to a bakery store, we saw an unused wood-fire oven and convinced the owner to donate it to our school. She did and that was the rest of the happy story,” said Ng, 62, who has been working as an education Volunteer since February 2010. Ng was previously a Peace Corps Volunteer in Mexico for three years where he worked with business owners to improve their operations.

In January, Ng started the baking program, which is held every Thursday for both teachers and students from a local primary school. Later in the year, they intend to increase the trainings to two-to three-times a week. The most recent training in early March yielded six loaves of bread and more than 100 dinner rolls. Ng taught students business skills and helped them to sell half their baked goods to the local community.

(Source: peacecorps.gov)

Uganda Africa baking bread small business income generation girls gender education primary school Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteers 50+

Peace Corps Volunteer Tackles a Sensitive Women’s Health Problem in Uganda

When Stacey Frankenstein-Markon discovered that girls in Uganda often used rags, old socks or wads of newspapers to do the job of sanitary napkins, she was shocked. She was even more horrified to realize that purchasing commercial pads was an impossible dream for most of them, since they come from families of subsistence farmers making about $1 a day in disposable income. 

“Disposable pads cost $1 for an 8-pack,” says the 25-year-old Peace Corps Volunteer, who with her husband, Tony Markon, is serving in Uganda as part of Michigan Technological University’s Peace Corps Master’s International (PCMI) program in applied science education. “If a family has three daughters who need pads, that family would have to spend 20 percent of their income just on menstrual pads. Who can afford to do that?”

The pad problem also was leading girls to stay away from school, fearing that they might stain their clothes and be badgered by boys, Frankenstein-Markon said.  Eventually, they fall so far behind that they have to drop out. 

But thanks to the inventiveness of another Peace Corps Volunteer who had served in the eastern Ugandan region just before the Markons got there in 2010, the Michigan Tech student has been able to help hundreds of girls practice better hygiene while they learn about menstruation, their bodies and women’s health.  And not incidentally, stay in school. 

(Source: mtu.edu)

Africa Master's International Peace Corps Volunteer Peace corps Uganda gender gender inequality health hygenie menstruation reproductive health sanitary napkins women's health Michigan Tech graduate school grad school

In honor of March Madness, here’s a great photo from our Digital Library. Peace Corps Youth Development Volunteer shared how she used basketball in her community:

This photo was taken in April 2011 in Guatemala. As an outlet and self-esteem builder, I started a basketball league for teenage girls from surrounding areas. This picture shows some of the girls wearing their newly donated jerseys from a family member in the states who works in the recreation department.

In honor of March Madness, here’s a great photo from our Digital Library. Peace Corps Youth Development Volunteer shared how she used basketball in her community:

This photo was taken in April 2011 in Guatemala. As an outlet and self-esteem builder, I started a basketball league for teenage girls from surrounding areas. This picture shows some of the girls wearing their newly donated jerseys from a family member in the states who works in the recreation department.

(Source: peacecorps.gov)

basketball sports March Madness gender self esteem girls recreation Peace Corps Peace Corps DigitalLibrary Guatemala Central America

lwsiv:

 
For three weeks during the winter school break another volunteer and myself ran a youth-camp.  There were approximately 24 kids, between the ages of 7-12, with a roughly even percentage of boys and girls.  We met every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday between the hours of 9-12pm for a total of 9 sessions. 
The cross-sector camp was a collaboration between the Health and Business sector in the department of Rivas. Covered topics included:  HIV/AIDS awareness, Gender Roles in Society, Self-esteem, Communication, Manualidades, Decision Making, Planning for the future, Leadership, and Creativity.  
súper vacaciones campamento
10 de febrero de 2012 - San Jorge, Rivas 

lwsiv:

For three weeks during the winter school break another volunteer and myself ran a youth-camp.  There were approximately 24 kids, between the ages of 7-12, with a roughly even percentage of boys and girls.  We met every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday between the hours of 9-12pm for a total of 9 sessions. 

The cross-sector camp was a collaboration between the Health and Business sector in the department of Rivas. Covered topics included:  HIV/AIDS awareness, Gender Roles in Society, Self-esteem, Communication, Manualidades, Decision Making, Planning for the future, Leadership, and Creativity.  

súper vacaciones campamento

10 de febrero de 2012 - San Jorge, Rivas 

Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteer reblogs youth health HIV/AIDS gender communications leadership creativity

Race to Benefit Senegalese Girls' Education

A West Michigan man says the empowerment of women in Senegal helps not only them, but benefits the environment as well.  

Andrew Oberstadt became an ally to women in that West African nation when he helped organize Race for Education, a run that will raise money for girls’ education in Senegal’s Tambacounda region.

He and Geoff Burmiester, both of Holland, organized the event with fellow Peace Corps Volunteers.

Oberstadt didn’t intend to take up the cause when he first moved to Senegal via the Peace Corps in 2010. He was more focused on issues such as environmental protection.

What Oberstadt didn’t realize was how keeping women in school could positively affect the environment, he said.

If women earn degrees, they begin careers. When they begin careers, many postpone marriage and pregnancy. When they can plan and space their pregnancies, they have fewer children. Overpopulation — a major issue for the African continent — wreaks havoc on the environment, as the demand for resources increases.

“I am now convinced that women’s empowerment and family planning are some of the best causes we can support to make a positive change in the world,” Oberstadt said in an email.

Peace Corps gender gender equality education environment West Africa Senegal Africa family planning empowerment