This photo was taken on a field trip to visit Association du Jour in Casablanca during a 3-day VAST Grant Training that was organized for Volunteers and their community partners. Most people in Morocco know of HIV/AIDS but they have never met anyone infected by it due to a high level of stigma and discrimination towards people living with HIV/AIDS. The highlights of this field trip are captured in this photo: putting a face to HIV/AIDS for Moroccans, Volunteers connecting community partners with leaders in the fight against HIV/AIDS in Morocco, and eliminating stigma and discrimination in Morocco. Association du Jour is the first community association of people living with AIDS in Morocco. - Peace Corps Health Volunteer Diana Yan

This photo was taken on a field trip to visit Association du Jour in Casablanca during a 3-day VAST Grant Training that was organized for Volunteers and their community partners. Most people in Morocco know of HIV/AIDS but they have never met anyone infected by it due to a high level of stigma and discrimination towards people living with HIV/AIDS. The highlights of this field trip are captured in this photo: putting a face to HIV/AIDS for Moroccans, Volunteers connecting community partners with leaders in the fight against HIV/AIDS in Morocco, and eliminating stigma and discrimination in Morocco. Association du Jour is the first community association of people living with AIDS in Morocco. - Peace Corps Health Volunteer Diana Yan

Morocco HIV/AIDS World AIDS Day health discrimination AIDS stigma Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteers


This photo was taken on August 2, 2009 with one of the several Window of Hope groups that I worked with in Namibia. Window of Hope is a UNICEF driven educational program made up of lifeskills and HIV/AIDS education workshops. We met twice a week for several hours to discuss things that many young students encounter throughout the world including self-esteem issues, gender issues, pregnancy and HIV/AIDS education. It was a safe-haven for students who could not speak openly due to traditional stigmas on feelings, and general fears or questions children have growing up in a rural hostel school. This group has just finished the program! - Peace Corps Education Volunteer Melissa Becci

This photo was taken on August 2, 2009 with one of the several Window of Hope groups that I worked with in Namibia. Window of Hope is a UNICEF driven educational program made up of lifeskills and HIV/AIDS education workshops. We met twice a week for several hours to discuss things that many young students encounter throughout the world including self-esteem issues, gender issues, pregnancy and HIV/AIDS education. It was a safe-haven for students who could not speak openly due to traditional stigmas on feelings, and general fears or questions children have growing up in a rural hostel school. This group has just finished the program! - Peace Corps Education Volunteer Melissa Becci

World AIDS Day health education gender Window of Hope Namibia Africa Peace Corps Volunteers

20kcourtenay:

My favorite photo ever. When I extended my contract with Peace Corps, I went to work for a HIV-service NGO in Morogoro called Faraja. This girl’s smile was captured at a play day for kids living with or affected by HIV. The image hangs on my wall and reminds me that there’s joy to be found in utter disparity and ugliness. 

What a beautiful photo! Please considering contributing to the Peace Corps Digital Library. We would love to include it in our collection!

20kcourtenay:

My favorite photo ever. When I extended my contract with Peace Corps, I went to work for a HIV-service NGO in Morogoro called Faraja. This girl’s smile was captured at a play day for kids living with or affected by HIV. The image hangs on my wall and reminds me that there’s joy to be found in utter disparity and ugliness. 

What a beautiful photo! Please considering contributing to the Peace Corps Digital Library. We would love to include it in our collection!

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This photo was taken in a community in Nicaragua during the month of May in 2011. As a maternal and child health Volunteer in El Jícaro, I assisted the doctors that day with collecting HIV tests. We ate lunch at a woman’s house, and she had five children, all very close in age. Her home was made of adobe, and she cooked everything over an open flame. The kids ran around barefoot and naked, except for this little girl who was in a pink, ruffly dress. One of the doctors had given her a piece of candy, and she seemed to treasure the candy more than anything. She didn’t want to eat it; she only wanted to hold it in her tiny hands! I titled this photo “Chigüina” because this word is what the people in the campo of Nicaragua use when they’re children.
- Peace Corps Health Volunteer Natalie Woodrum 

This photo was taken in a community in Nicaragua during the month of May in 2011. As a maternal and child health Volunteer in El Jícaro, I assisted the doctors that day with collecting HIV tests. We ate lunch at a woman’s house, and she had five children, all very close in age. Her home was made of adobe, and she cooked everything over an open flame. The kids ran around barefoot and naked, except for this little girl who was in a pink, ruffly dress. One of the doctors had given her a piece of candy, and she seemed to treasure the candy more than anything. She didn’t want to eat it; she only wanted to hold it in her tiny hands! I titled this photo “Chigüina” because this word is what the people in the campo of Nicaragua use when they’re children.

- Peace Corps Health Volunteer Natalie Woodrum 

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A new group of 28 Peace Corps Volunteers were sworn-in earlier this month, bringing the number of Peace Corps Volunteers currently serving in Liberia to 39. The new class of Volunteers includes 21 Peace Corps Volunteers who will serve two-year assignments as high school teachers and seven Peace Corps Response Volunteers who will work with county health teams. They are pictured here with Liberian President Her Excellency Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, President of the Republic of Liberia. 

A new group of 28 Peace Corps Volunteers were sworn-in earlier this month, bringing the number of Peace Corps Volunteers currently serving in Liberia to 39. The new class of Volunteers includes 21 Peace Corps Volunteers who will serve two-year assignments as high school teachers and seven Peace Corps Response Volunteers who will work with county health teams. They are pictured here with Liberian President Her Excellency Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, President of the Republic of Liberia. 

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