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Weekly Awesome Mozambique: Training of Trainers in Zambezia Province

On Thursday July 5th, in Mocuba, Zambezia province, eight Peace Corps Health Volunteers, ten Mozambican counterparts, one representative from PIRCOM (Programa Inter-Religioso Contra a Malária), and one Peace Corps Staff member participated in a general malaria prevention “Training of Trainers.” The purpose of this workshop was two-fold: to propagate malaria prevention messages to the communities where participants live and to prepare PCVs and Mozambican counterparts to assist in the upcoming net distribution and spraying campaigns in the districts where they live and work.

Read more about the training here!

malaria Peace Corps Stomp Out Malaria training health Mozambique malaria prevention

"It’s possible to end this – in our lifetime. What we need are not slogans about African Illnesses, emotional appeals to Save Those In Need, or personal campaigns to Guilt Everyone Into Donating Money. My neighbors here in Senegal are working diligently to protect themselves from infection."
- Austin Post-Bulletin highlight on 3rd year volunteer Michael Toso http://postbulletin.com/news/stories/display.php?id=1494209 (via stompoutmalaria)

malaria Stomp Out Malaria Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteer Africa health


Malaria is an incredibly deadly, pervasive disease. It kills between 750,000 to 1.2 million people every year, mostly children and pregnant women.
When you really see it at the local level, though, its real impact becomes clear. In my host family alone every single child had malaria last year at least once, some three or four times. It exacts an extraordinarily heavy toll on the health, productivity, and finances of the village, and nearly every family has lost children to the disease.
Prevention work can have incredibly positive effect on the well being of these families. Simple interventions like bed nets, indoor residual spraying and prompt treatment can save huge amounts of money, time and ultimately lives.

- Peace Corps Health Volunteer Ian Hennessee

Malaria is an incredibly deadly, pervasive disease. It kills between 750,000 to 1.2 million people every year, mostly children and pregnant women.

When you really see it at the local level, though, its real impact becomes clear. In my host family alone every single child had malaria last year at least once, some three or four times. It exacts an extraordinarily heavy toll on the health, productivity, and finances of the village, and nearly every family has lost children to the disease.

Prevention work can have incredibly positive effect on the well being of these families. Simple interventions like bed nets, indoor residual spraying and prompt treatment can save huge amounts of money, time and ultimately lives.

- Peace Corps Health Volunteer Ian Hennessee

Malaria Stomp Out Malaria health youth child mortality Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteer

Working in Malaria prevention is important primarily, because the disease is comparatively simple to prevent and yet remains a leading cause of death throughout Africa and many other parts of the developing world. Through the proper use of bed nets, covering up exposed skin during evening hours, and removing/covering sources of standing water around your home diminish the mosquito population and therefore your chances of catching malaria.  

From personal experience and living in Mozambique for the past 2 years, I can easily say that Malaria is one of the most diagnosed and treated cases at our local Hospital, and that all of my neighbors have been diagnosed or treated for malaria at some point in my service. I also say this while we are in the middle of our rainy season here in Mozambique, and already Malaria cases are beginning to skyrocket as the mosquito population begins to boom.

 Peace Corps Volunteer Jason Hillis

 

Mozambique Africa Malaria World Malaria Day mosquitos malaria prevention Stomp Out Malaria

I’m starting to work on a Bed Net Distribution and Installation Campaign. My plan is have trainings/demonstrations to heads of households in the rural areas we visit on how to install the nets, then give them a net and check-sheet of how to do it and send them on their way. A week or so later we pop back in to inspect how it went. This plan is a bit stalled right now as we’re waiting for the seasonal shipment of nets to come in for distribution.

 Until new nets are available, I have been working in the rural areas with a local Health Extension Worker on installations of preexisting nets. This means sewing up holes, attempting to reinstall crazily hung nets, and just trying to keep my chin up.

Peace Corps Volunteer Jean DeMarco

(Source: lethiopiah.wordpress.com)

World Malaria Day Ethiopia malaria Stomping Out Malaria Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteer

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In September 2011, Health PCV Emily Engel from Anchorage, AL worked with her counterparts Haoua Ouédraogo and Mamouna Zida to promote neem cream production. The group created a full day workshop to reach all of the satellite villages in their health jurisdiction. During the workshop 55 women from surrounding villages learned about the basics of malaria, the business of selling neem cream and how to make the locally produced mosquito repellant.

Women in Kalsaka formed a group to produce neem cream after the workshop. They sell neem cream in small bags for 150 cfa and 200 cfa. The group is also working to produce liquid soap and hard soap as well as encouraging the women to have their own small businesses. Burkina is the second largest producer of Shea Butter in the world, so this major ingredient in neem cream is easily found in most small villages. The project is an inexpensive and popular among volunteers and communities in Burkina Faso.

health Malaria Burkina Faso Africa Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteers neem cream soap small business shea butter

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Weekly Awesome, Burkina Faso: The “Fight Against Malaria” Song with PCV Sara Goodman

PCV Sara Goodman is Non-Formal Education Volunteer posted in Burkina Faso who serves on Peace Corps Burkina Faso’s Community Health and AIDS Task-force, a group charged with promoting malaria prevention and treatment activities among the volunteer community.  In addition to being an awesome volunteer and health promoter, Sara is also quite the musician, having studied Instrumental Music Education at the University of Illinois.  To engage volunteers and communities in the fight against malaria Sara created this music video for the parody song “Lutter Contre Palu*.”  Check out the lyrics below and sing along!


“Lutter Contre Palu” Lyrics

C’est la faut des moustiques qui causent le palu

Trop des piqures ça va fait mal

C’est un maladie qui est endémique

Ici au Burkina et partout l’Afrique

Est-ce-que c’est mieux ou c’est le pire

Il faut que nous allons decrire

Qu’est ce que vous pouvez faire pour prevenir

Est-ce-que c’est mieux ou c’est le pire

Il faut que nous allons decrire

Qu’est ce que vous pouvez faire pour prevenir

 

Il faut dormir sous un moustiquaire

Qui est très bien attaché

Il faut utiliser le pommade de neem

Après laver et avant dormir

Il faut lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, contre palu

Il faut lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, contre palu

Il faut lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, contre palu

Parce que ça va sauvegarder beaucoup des vies

 

Si vous aller dormir dehors ce soir

Il faut être protéger

Attacher le moustiquaire parmi les arbres

Et vous pouvez dormir sans les piqures

 

Si vous avez froid il faut faire attention

Si vous avez aussi le fievre

Il faut vous vous emballez dans un pagne mouiller

Et allez immediatement au dispensaire

 

Est-ce-que c’est mieux ou c’est le pire

Il faut que nous allons decrire

Qu’est ce que vous pouvez faire pour prevenir

Il faut lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, contre palu

Il faut lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, contre palu

Il faut lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, lutter, contre palu

Parce que ça va sauvegarder beaucoup des vies

 

*this parody song is in compliance with the fair-use clause in U.S copyright law.

 

reblog Peace Corps Volunteer malaria Burkino Faso music Africa education health HIV AIDS

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Weekly Awesome Senegal, part V

Volunteers in the Tamba region of Senegal took the fight against malaria on the road, biking to nine villages with messages about preventing and treating malaria. Knowing that some volunteers bring a variety of surprising talents to country with them, they decided to make the project as inclusive as possible. A “tam-tam” drum, used to get everyone’s attention and bring the villagers to a centralized location, opened each event. The volunteers introduced malaria concepts with skits, then asked a community health worker to do a health talk about malaria and to answer questions from the villagers. Finally, the volunteers demonstrated how to make neem lotion, a natural mosquito repellent made from cheap, readily available ingredients and the leaves of the neem tree.  

Peace Corps Senegal Tamba Tambacounda Weekly Awesome malaria neem reblog