Peace Corps, PEPFAR and Global Health Service Corps Launch Public-Private Partnership to Boost Training for Health Professionals in Developing Countries

The Peace Corps, the U.S. Presidents’ Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), and the Global Health Service Corps are launching an innovative public-private partnership to place nurses, physicians and other health professionals as adjunct faculty in medical or nursing schools overseas. The Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP) will address health professional shortages by investing in capacity and building support for existing medical and nursing education programs in less developed countries. The new program is expected to begin in Tanzania, Malawi and Uganda in July 2013. Participants will serve in the Peace Corps Response program for one-year assignments. 

(Source: peacecorps.gov)

Africa HIV/AIDS Malawi PEPFAR Peace Corps Response Tanzania Uganda doctors education global health health professionals maternal health medical school medicine nurses nursing nursing school peace corps public health sub-saharan Africa teaching the U.S. Presidents’ Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief AIDS HIV


I had incredible experiences with mothers. I saw a delivery in the crowded district hospital and after, an episiotomy repair. I also visited a traditional birth attendant home, arriving just after two women had delivered the most beautiful and perfect babies. When I left Malawi, I felt inspired and proud of my impact and the footprint I hoped I had left behind. - Peace Corps Response Volunteer Lauren Goodwin

According to figures released by UNICEF, a Malawian woman’s lifetime risk of maternal death is 1 in 36; compare that to America’s 1 in 2,100 and Norway’s 1 in 7,600. High maternal mortality in Malawi is due in part to the fact that only 54 percent of deliveries have a skilled medical professional present. Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) fill the gap in rural, resource-deprived areas where maternal health facilities are not accessible.
Learn more about how Lauren is trying to make “1 in 36” a thing of the past: Because 1 in 36 Is Too Much

I had incredible experiences with mothers. I saw a delivery in the crowded district hospital and after, an episiotomy repair. I also visited a traditional birth attendant home, arriving just after two women had delivered the most beautiful and perfect babies. When I left Malawi, I felt inspired and proud of my impact and the footprint I hoped I had left behind. - Peace Corps Response Volunteer Lauren Goodwin

According to figures released by UNICEF, a Malawian woman’s lifetime risk of maternal death is 1 in 36; compare that to America’s 1 in 2,100 and Norway’s 1 in 7,600. High maternal mortality in Malawi is due in part to the fact that only 54 percent of deliveries have a skilled medical professional present. Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) fill the gap in rural, resource-deprived areas where maternal health facilities are not accessible.

Learn more about how Lauren is trying to make “1 in 36” a thing of the past: Because 1 in 36 Is Too Much

Peace Corps Peace Corps Response Peace Corps Volunteer maternal health Malawi Africa childbirth traditional birth attendants maternal mortality medicine Current Countries