phylasophy:

The Saludable School Project was first started 8 years ago when the first Peace Corps volunteer was welcomed into the community. A strong promotion for healthy living and healthy habits was asserted and passed on to the volunteers that followed and continue through each volunteer’s work. As the community continues to grow and build within, it is time to construct growth externally. The local school has an incredible connection with the core of the community and many of the surrounding areas send their children to the school because of the education and community assistance. A small school with big plans, each student has their books, healthy snacks and tooth brush in hand all provided by the Minstry of Education of Paraguay, but more is needed to continue healthy habits. In collaboration with the professors of the school and family and friends both near and far the school wishes to create sanitary locations in the school for the youth to wash their hands, brush teeth and cook food for school and after school activities. The school raised enough funds to finish bathrooms for both boys and girls this past year all from community contribution and hard work. The community with great emphasis on parents of youth are actively involved and ready to work for the children of this town and Paraguay’s future. This next project engages all once again in the development of an improved place of learning and living. Thank you for your support!donate at the link below! http://tinyurl.com/neybvtf

#peacecorps #healthy #project #peace #paraguay

phylasophy:

The Saludable School Project was first started 8 years ago when the first Peace Corps volunteer was welcomed into the community. A strong promotion for healthy living and healthy habits was asserted and passed on to the volunteers that followed and continue through each volunteer’s work. As the community continues to grow and build within, it is time to construct growth externally. The local school has an incredible connection with the core of the community and many of the surrounding areas send their children to the school because of the education and community assistance. A small school with big plans, each student has their books, healthy snacks and tooth brush in hand all provided by the Minstry of Education of Paraguay, but more is needed to continue healthy habits. In collaboration with the professors of the school and family and friends both near and far the school wishes to create sanitary locations in the school for the youth to wash their hands, brush teeth and cook food for school and after school activities. The school raised enough funds to finish bathrooms for both boys and girls this past year all from community contribution and hard work. The community with great emphasis on parents of youth are actively involved and ready to work for the children of this town and Paraguay’s future. This next project engages all once again in the development of an improved place of learning and living. Thank you for your support!donate at the link below! http://tinyurl.com/neybvtf

#peacecorps #healthy #project #peace #paraguay

healthy project paraguay peace peacecorps reblogs

At the community center Mita Rory, a place that supports 180 families giving homework help, family support, and regular beneficial presentations, a group of 12 women work together to help run the community center and to improve their community. One of their projects is a soup kitchen that provides lunch three times a week to approximately 400 children of the community. The women work together voluntarily using local government donations in order to cook and provide meals to these hungry children. Every three months, the community center is provided with food donations, which are supposed to last them until the supplies are replenished. Unfortunately, due to the poor conditions of the kitchen, food donations are always spoiled or ruined, preventing the soup kitchen to provide meals to children. 

The kitchen at Mita Rory was, essentially, a rotting wooden shack that constantly leaked from rain and became home to dozens of rats. Due to water damage and hungry rodents, the food would become unusable, and the lunch program would be suspended until new fresh food was supplied again, leaving hundreds of hungry children that depend on this program. The women cooked what usable food they had inside this shack by burning wood or carbon, causing a cloud of smoke in the room affecting their health as smoke filled their lungs and stung their eyes. It became clear to the 12 women in charge that rat traps and patching holes in the roof was not the solution and that, if they wanted to continue the soup kitchen, they needed to improve their infrastructure. 

Every week, the women met to devise a plan as to how to gain the funds to improve their kitchen. For months they tried soliciting help from the local government, but were denied. Eventually hope came from a local NGO donation, which provided the community center with new kitchen equipment. The community center now had pots, pans, plates, cups, and tables but where still left with the wooden shack. With a little more insistence from the women, the community center was provided with a new refrigerator and a large oven that would eventually be used in cooking/confectionary courses for community members, in order to provide new work skills and generate income. Still, the women were left with their wooden shack, and were in fear of installing their new equipment for it would surely be destroyed from the leaks (maybe even the rats). Exhausting all resources, it was finally time to take advantage of outside resources and apply for a Small Project Assistance (SPA) grant through Peace Corps-Paraguay.

The community center was awarded with approximately $2,600 to be used for construction and was put to use right away. Community members came together to tear down the old shack piece by piece, saving any materials that could be used again. The women worked together to help monitor expenditures and evaluate the construction’s progress as they proudly witnessed their dream slowly coming true. As they realized that more money would be needed to finish the building, they set up their new oven and began cooking for a bake sale in order to gain the extra funds needed. 

Soon enough, the building was put together and the tables were placed in order to serve its first lunch on “Día del Niño” or Children’s Day. Here, 500 people were able to come together in the newly built room, to have their first sit down lunch as they appropriately celebrated Children’s Day, marking the first of many lunches in the building.

Paraguay Feed the Future nutrition Small Project Assistance USAID community development

phylasophy:

In all corners of the globe, “girl power” is a potent idea that has been transforming societies for many generations. From the economy to public health, female empowerment is a key element in the progression and evolution of any developing society. For this reason, Peace Corps has made Gender and Development a worldwide initiative. Camp GLOW (Girls Leading Our World) is a camp that has been held internationally in Peace Corps countries, and February 2014 will mark the third year it is held in Paraguay. Camp GLOW Paraguay includes motivational speakers, engaging activities on sexual education, self-expression, creativity, goal setting, value formation, gender roles and personal identity. With your support, our dream to fund Camp GLOW 2014 can turn into reality for this year’s motivated participants! Please unite with us in the movement towards female empowerment in Paraguay! To donate, click on the link below! Thank you for joining the cause!

http://tinyurl.com/qg3j8qz

Paraguay South America girls GIRL RISING PEACE 2013 2014 girl power feminist peace corps reblogs Camp GLOW

The center is designed to benefit the growing number of children who roam the streets while their parents work, who live in extreme poverty, or who are abandoned. Our objective is to continue improving the lives of socially disadvantaged or at-risk youth by strengthening certain elements of our current center.

- Peace Corps Volunteer Sandra Rose Wildermuth, who is working with her community in Paraguay to renovate the local youth center, which serves as a soup kitchen and space for educational resources and counseling

(Source: peacecorps.gov)

Paraguay Peace Corps Volunteer youth poverty at-risk youth community development Peace Corps Partnership Program

freenasta:

With the help of two fellow Peace Corps volunteers, and contacts from the Department of Agriculture, we were recently able to complete a successful chicken management workshop in Calle San Rafael. This workshop gave 27 participants the tools needed to make there own chicken feed, watering systems, homemade chicken coops, and information about chicken health. It’s a more sustainable alternative to asking for fund for agricultural projects from the government, a practice that too often pervades Paraguayan campo culture.

freenasta:

With the help of two fellow Peace Corps volunteers, and contacts from the Department of Agriculture, we were recently able to complete a successful chicken management workshop in Calle San Rafael. This workshop gave 27 participants the tools needed to make there own chicken feed, watering systems, homemade chicken coops, and information about chicken health. It’s a more sustainable alternative to asking for fund for agricultural projects from the government, a practice that too often pervades Paraguayan campo culture.

Paraguay Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteers agriculture sustainability reblog volunteer projects

Peace Corps Volunteers Commemorate Earth Day

Peace Corps Volunteers worldwide commemorated Earth Day by working with people in their local communities to become more environmentally conscious and protect the local ecosystem. Volunteers regularly help communities organize recycling projects and environmental youth clubs, assist with park management, and forest, soil, and marine conservation.

(Source: go.usa.gov)

Cambodia Malawi Paraguay Earth Day environment environmental awareness fuel efficient rivers climate change community development youth recycling parks marine conservation Peace Corps Volunteers Peace Corps

Peace Corps Volunteers Lindsay Fay, Mario Leiva, Brett Michaelson, Maureen Stickel, and Casey Weston recently coordinated the first “Young Entrepreneurs of Paraguay” workshop in Asunción, Paraguay. Thirty-nine youth from across the country attended sessions on business development, entrepreneurship, marketing and career planning. Several Paraguayan organizations donated resources for the workshop and five young Paraguayan entrepreneurs shared personal success stories during guest speaking sessions.

“We wanted to promote entrepreneurship education in a fun and dynamic way,” said Stickel, a graduate of Georgetown University who has been working as a community economic development volunteer since June 2010. “The workshop was a great way to connect like-minded youth, and it was amazing to see how much the participants grew in such a short period of time.” 

(Source: peacecorps.gov)

peace corps Paraguay entrepreneurship education youth business development marketing career development