Food Fridays: Mafe (Senegal)

peacecorpsnortheast:

image

This delicious recipe for lamb and peanut stew comes from Amber Patterson in Massachusetts:

Mafe

Ingredients

  • Cooking oil
  • 1-2 lbs. lamb
  • 1 C peanut butter
  • 1-2 C water or beef broth
  • 1 Maggi cube (chicken bouillon also works)
  • 1-2 onions, finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp. tomato paste
  • 2-4 tomatoes, cut into sections
  • 1 hot chile pepper
  • 1 or more chopped vegetables: cabbage, carrots; eggplant, potatoes, squash, sweet potatoes, or turnips are commonly used
  • Salt & black pepper (to taste)

Steps

  1. Heat oil in a large pot. Sauté meat & onions over high heat.
  2. Reduce heat and simmer for a few minutes.
  3. Add all of the remaining ingredients except for the peanut butter & water. Simmer for about 30 minutes until all ingredients are tender.
  4. Reduce heat and add peanut butter. Stir.
  5. Add water or broth as needed to make a smooth sauce.
  6. Serve over rice.

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Peace Corps Volunteer Builds First Bathroom in Senegal School

Peace Corps Volunteer Karen Chaffraix is working with her community members in Senegal to install the first bathroom facility at a nearby elementary school. The new three-stall facility is complete with running water for hand-washing and will help prevent water contamination and disease through safe and effective waste disposal.

“Continued community participation is essential to the success of the project,” Chaffraix said. “Hopefully those involved will be empowered to undertake future projects and will contribute to improved health and sanitation for all.”

Africa Senegal health clean water sanitation Peace Corps Volunteers

senegallife:

Comment: iamsidibe said “Photo of a photo taken at my mother’s Peace Corps host village in Senegal. My mother lived in Senegal for four years where she built a school, dug wells, planted trees, and well, made me. Earlier this year, I visited her village family and they showed me this picture. Life had come full circle.
#tbt #senegal #babel #peacecorps #villagelife #henna #impact #touch #memories #myheartisinafrica”

senegallife:

Comment: iamsidibe said “Photo of a photo taken at my mother’s Peace Corps host village in Senegal. My mother lived in Senegal for four years where she built a school, dug wells, planted trees, and well, made me. Earlier this year, I visited her village family and they showed me this picture. Life had come full circle.

#tbt #senegal #babel #peacecorps #villagelife #henna #impact #touch #memories #myheartisinafrica”

(Source: instagram.com)

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onyva:

Yesterday I spent six and a half hours in a round table meeting with all possible community partners of the Linguere High School. It started out extremely well - the student government had put together a great (albeit rather dramatic - can a school really be in agony?) presentation about the problems facing the school and what they would like to do to change things. Then community member after community member came up to pledge their association’s support - the gendarmes are giving 100,000 CFA, the Association for the Development of Women is giving a ton of cement, etc. Then this one man comes up and goes, “Well, this is great and all, but why don’t we just have an NGO build us an entirely new school? That’s what they’re there for.”
He’s partly right. There are plenty of NGOs whose sole mission is school construction. But the attitude of “oh, we could do this ourselves but why bother because an NGO could do it for us” is one of the biggest obstacles that we come across in the Peace Corps. Many NGOs here provide resources of the monetary sort, while we are primarily here to work on capacity-building, and a lot of people have trouble understanding that. Not to mention that when a community has the motivation and capabilities to do a project themselves, I have a huge problem with them taking resources from an NGO that could be building a school for a community that has no resources whatsoever. (All of this rant glossing over the fact that the school is supposed to be a governmental project anyways, but the administrations of both the previous and current presidents have done nothing to fix things.)
Luckily, I think those who are most involved with the project, including Ngouille Sec (pictured above) and her sister Jamma, are pretty set on getting things done themselves. If everything goes well, by next October when classes start up for the fall 2013 semester, the high school will have at least two new classrooms. And that will be very inspiring to see.

onyva:

Yesterday I spent six and a half hours in a round table meeting with all possible community partners of the Linguere High School. It started out extremely well - the student government had put together a great (albeit rather dramatic - can a school really be in agony?) presentation about the problems facing the school and what they would like to do to change things. Then community member after community member came up to pledge their association’s support - the gendarmes are giving 100,000 CFA, the Association for the Development of Women is giving a ton of cement, etc. Then this one man comes up and goes, “Well, this is great and all, but why don’t we just have an NGO build us an entirely new school? That’s what they’re there for.”

He’s partly right. There are plenty of NGOs whose sole mission is school construction. But the attitude of “oh, we could do this ourselves but why bother because an NGO could do it for us” is one of the biggest obstacles that we come across in the Peace Corps. Many NGOs here provide resources of the monetary sort, while we are primarily here to work on capacity-building, and a lot of people have trouble understanding that. Not to mention that when a community has the motivation and capabilities to do a project themselves, I have a huge problem with them taking resources from an NGO that could be building a school for a community that has no resources whatsoever. (All of this rant glossing over the fact that the school is supposed to be a governmental project anyways, but the administrations of both the previous and current presidents have done nothing to fix things.)

Luckily, I think those who are most involved with the project, including Ngouille Sec (pictured above) and her sister Jamma, are pretty set on getting things done themselves. If everything goes well, by next October when classes start up for the fall 2013 semester, the high school will have at least two new classrooms. And that will be very inspiring to see.

Senegal Africa education inspiring women NGOs development work host country nationals community development capacity building schools student government classroom challenges Peace Corps Volunteers

She Works, She Lives! (Elle Travaille, Elle Vit! French, 2008) is a documentary that explores the role of women in Senegalese society and highlights the importance of girl’s education in particular. Each of the five Senegalese women interviewed for the film come from diverse backgrounds and followed distinct paths to get to where they are today. Some of them come from small villages while others come from urban environments, some from supportive families and others from less supportive families. But at some point in their lives, each of these five women realized that she had the potential to be more and to achieve more than what was expected of her. This documentary looks at the histories of these inspiring women, the feelings they have about their work and their upbringing, and their hopes for the future of women in Senegal.

The film is being distributed to Peace Corps Volunteers and schools throughout Senegal along with a packet of supplemental educational materials to facilitate discussions regarding the role of women in Senegalese society. 

International Women's Day video Senegal Senegalese Africa Peace Corps Volunteers IWD education girls' education inspiration diversity film documentaries

Maternal Health “Ah ha!” Moment - Peace Corps Service Leads to Career as a Midwife

In this video,Peace Corps Volunteer Caitlin Givens talks about her “Ah ha!” moment in the Sahel desert that led her to shift career paths and become a midwife. During nursing and midwifery school, she serves as a doula and helps women plan for labor and birth. She now draws from her Peace Corps experience to connect with and care for women from diverse backgrounds in the U.S.

Africa Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteer Senegal YouTube ah ha! career path doula maternal health midwife mother's day video Sahel Desert