When Volunteers asked the community members how they think they had become infected with HIV/AIDS, they said the culture of jaboya – or the practice of trading sex for fish – which is prevalent throughout the communities surrounding the lake, could be the reason.

In Kenya, Peace Corps Volunteers have been working to end the practice of trading sex for fish, which has perpetuated the spread of HIV/AIDS among communities along Lake Victoria. Women who rely on the trade of fish to support their families are often pressured into prostitution with area fishermen to secure fresh fish.

Since 2011, three Peace Corps Volunteers have helped local women find financial independence. Working with Kenyan businesses and U.S. federal government partners, the Volunteers have acquired boats for women involved in the fish trade and supported the development of their own fishing business.

AIDS gender issues sex workers Kenya Africa

This photo was taken after a week-long training of trainers on the topic of HIV/AIDS and behavior change communication in the Philippines, which included interviews of local sex workers, and a testimonial from a person living with HIV.  
Peace Corps Youth Development Volunteer Blake Van Fleteren, one of the facilitators of the training, lighting the last candle to complete the red ribbon. 

This photo was taken after a week-long training of trainers on the topic of HIV/AIDS and behavior change communication in the Philippines, which included interviews of local sex workers, and a testimonial from a person living with HIV.  

Peace Corps Youth Development Volunteer Blake Van Fleteren, one of the facilitators of the training, lighting the last candle to complete the red ribbon. 

Philippines Asia World AIDS Day PLWH sex workers red ribbon HIV AIDS