When was the last time you attended a Hack-A-Thon or charged your device using solar energy? Volunteers around the world apply different technologies to engage with their communities. Whether it’s to finish a project or connect back home, with community members, or each other, Volunteers use various social media sites, translation services, and hardware devices to strengthen their connection with the community and the community’s connection to the world.Are you ready to serve? Get started here!

When was the last time you attended a Hack-A-Thon or charged your device using solar energy? Volunteers around the world apply different technologies to engage with their communities. Whether it’s to finish a project or connect back home, with community members, or each other, Volunteers use various social media sites, translation services, and hardware devices to strengthen their connection with the community and the community’s connection to the world.

Are you ready to serve? Get started here!

tech4dev technology community development digital


Armed with laptops, pillows and coffee, University of California Berkeley students gathered on a mid-November weekend for one reason: to hack for the Peace Corps. Working through the night, seven teams battled for $2000 in prize money and, after twenty long hours of work, presented their innovations to a panel of judges. But that weekend, winning wasn’t everything.
This year, Peace Corps sponsored UC Berkeley’s School of Information’s annual hackathon. “Normally at hackathons, people are mostly excited about their own ideas and own pet projects. The enthusiasm people showed for the Peace Corps was very special,” said Seema Puthyapurayil, a veteran hackathon attendee and one of the organizers.

Code for Good: The Peace Corps/UC Berkeley Social Innovation Hackathon

Armed with laptops, pillows and coffee, University of California Berkeley students gathered on a mid-November weekend for one reason: to hack for the Peace Corps. Working through the night, seven teams battled for $2000 in prize money and, after twenty long hours of work, presented their innovations to a panel of judges. But that weekend, winning wasn’t everything.

This year, Peace Corps sponsored UC Berkeley’s School of Information’s annual hackathon. “Normally at hackathons, people are mostly excited about their own ideas and own pet projects. The enthusiasm people showed for the Peace Corps was very special,” said Seema Puthyapurayil, a veteran hackathon attendee and one of the organizers.

Code for Good: The Peace Corps/UC Berkeley Social Innovation Hackathon

technology University of California Berkeley social innovation

Peace Corps Volunteer Ginger Anderson works with participants at Camp TechKobwa. Created by Peace Corps Volunteers in Rwanda, Camp TechKobwa focused on empowerment for girls through gaining skills and confidence using computers and media technology. The camp encouraged young women to become active citizens by building their self-esteem and confidence, and helped them start computer and media clubs with their information and communication technology teachers upon returning to their schools. #Africa #Rwanda #camp #genderequality #girls #women #empowerment #computers #technology #media #USAID #latergram

Peace Corps Volunteer Ginger Anderson works with participants at Camp TechKobwa. Created by Peace Corps Volunteers in Rwanda, Camp TechKobwa focused on empowerment for girls through gaining skills and confidence using computers and media technology. The camp encouraged young women to become active citizens by building their self-esteem and confidence, and helped them start computer and media clubs with their information and communication technology teachers upon returning to their schools. #Africa #Rwanda #camp #genderequality #girls #women #empowerment #computers #technology #media #USAID #latergram

empowerment computers africa camp girls genderequality usaid rwanda media technology latergram women

Managing inventory with SMS for a micro-enterprise based in rural Ecuador. Teaching business to students with a game. Helping groups with limited resources organize and meet. Notifications for new deliveries and stock outs of essential medicines at public clinics and hospitals to patients. 

These are just a few of the ideas in the featured problem set for the Peace Corps Innovation Challenge that culminates this weekend at the Random Hacks of Kindness Global Hackathon! Choose a Peace Corps problem statement to champion and sign up to participate now http://1.usa.gov/19jCwuf

national day of civic hacking hackathon random hacks of kindess RHOK technology


“Currently, community members either have to rely on the limited materials at the local community center or have to venture outside of the town to access information, including newspapers. The new library will promote self-learning and literacy through access to books and computer programs, in addition to imparting management skills to the teachers and students that will run and maintain the library.”

- Peace Corps Volunter Claire McManus, who is working with her Dominican community to build its first library

“Currently, community members either have to rely on the limited materials at the local community center or have to venture outside of the town to access information, including newspapers. The new library will promote self-learning and literacy through access to books and computer programs, in addition to imparting management skills to the teachers and students that will run and maintain the library.”

- Peace Corps Volunter Claire McManus, who is working with her Dominican community to build its first library

dominican republic library books community development education students literacy technology


This photo features a group of 5th graders at Waterberg Primary School in Namibia. It was taken November 10, 2009 shortly after the new computers arrived and the desks and painting had been completed. Along with teachers from my school, I solicited and created a relationship with a nearby local German NGO which ultimately donated 22 new computers to Waterberg Primary School, while the school fundraised for and built the tables and desks. The new computer lab that resulted was used by the school faculty and staff, students and surrounding village community and I held daily training courses for teachers, adults and students. When I left Waterberg, the Internet had not yet been set up, but my explanations and lessons for computer use had registered and made an impact, because 10 months after my departure from the school (and to this day), I received an email from my principal (and several from eager former students), I knew that the computer lab was being used and valued.

- Peace Corps Education Volunteer Melissa Becci

This photo features a group of 5th graders at Waterberg Primary School in Namibia. It was taken November 10, 2009 shortly after the new computers arrived and the desks and painting had been completed. Along with teachers from my school, I solicited and created a relationship with a nearby local German NGO which ultimately donated 22 new computers to Waterberg Primary School, while the school fundraised for and built the tables and desks. The new computer lab that resulted was used by the school faculty and staff, students and surrounding village community and I held daily training courses for teachers, adults and students. When I left Waterberg, the Internet had not yet been set up, but my explanations and lessons for computer use had registered and made an impact, because 10 months after my departure from the school (and to this day), I received an email from my principal (and several from eager former students), I knew that the computer lab was being used and valued.

- Peace Corps Education Volunteer Melissa Becci

Namibia Peace Corps Peace Corps Volunteers adult education computers education email internet primary school teachers technology youth Africa


We received 29 computers from a donor in Australia for the computer lab at one of our primary schools. Woody got a few of them set up in time to have an “impromptu” opening of the new computer lab after school just to allow the kids to check out the computers.
Unfortunately due to a wiring mismatch with the electrical sockets, we only had enough working outlets to be able to get two computers running. But, after letting a few kids into the lab to try out the computers, we soon realized that they were very excited to use the computers. We let them play typing tutor games and demonstrated to them where to hold their fingers on the keyboard.
For some of them, it was their first time even touching a computer.

Peace Corps Education Volunteer Robin Al-haddad

We received 29 computers from a donor in Australia for the computer lab at one of our primary schools. Woody got a few of them set up in time to have an “impromptu” opening of the new computer lab after school just to allow the kids to check out the computers.

Unfortunately due to a wiring mismatch with the electrical sockets, we only had enough working outlets to be able to get two computers running. But, after letting a few kids into the lab to try out the computers, we soon realized that they were very excited to use the computers. We let them play typing tutor games and demonstrated to them where to hold their fingers on the keyboard.

For some of them, it was their first time even touching a computer.

Peace Corps Education Volunteer Robin Al-haddad

South Africa Africa technology computers education students youth Peace Corps Peace Corps Digital Library