In the photo, I was teaching two of my host sisters, Samira and Hafsa, about how in America we make wishes on dandelions. We live in the Sahara desert but near an Oasis. Here the children know every plant, herb and even weed that grows. They always want me to eat some strange seed, or smell a weird plant. Now they know another use for dandelions! Photo taken by fellow Volunteer, Jo Troyer.

Peace Corps Youth Development Volunteer	Rachel Rubinski

In the photo, I was teaching two of my host sisters, Samira and Hafsa, about how in America we make wishes on dandelions. We live in the Sahara desert but near an Oasis. Here the children know every plant, herb and even weed that grows. They always want me to eat some strange seed, or smell a weird plant. Now they know another use for dandelions! Photo taken by fellow Volunteer, Jo Troyer.

Peace Corps Youth Development Volunteer Rachel Rubinski

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This photograph was taken during technical training in the small community of La Cumbre, Dominican Republic in 2008. A group of volunteers woke up early to embark on a hike with a host brother through the Dominican forest. This young boy was eating a mango for breakfast in the morning light outside of a traditional “campo” home.

Peace Corps Environment Volunteer Amy Martin

This photograph was taken during technical training in the small community of La Cumbre, Dominican Republic in 2008. A group of volunteers woke up early to embark on a hike with a host brother through the Dominican forest. This young boy was eating a mango for breakfast in the morning light outside of a traditional “campo” home.

Peace Corps Environment Volunteer Amy Martin

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We received 29 computers from a donor in Australia for the computer lab at one of our primary schools. Woody got a few of them set up in time to have an “impromptu” opening of the new computer lab after school just to allow the kids to check out the computers.
Unfortunately due to a wiring mismatch with the electrical sockets, we only had enough working outlets to be able to get two computers running. But, after letting a few kids into the lab to try out the computers, we soon realized that they were very excited to use the computers. We let them play typing tutor games and demonstrated to them where to hold their fingers on the keyboard.
For some of them, it was their first time even touching a computer.

Peace Corps Education Volunteer Robin Al-haddad

We received 29 computers from a donor in Australia for the computer lab at one of our primary schools. Woody got a few of them set up in time to have an “impromptu” opening of the new computer lab after school just to allow the kids to check out the computers.

Unfortunately due to a wiring mismatch with the electrical sockets, we only had enough working outlets to be able to get two computers running. But, after letting a few kids into the lab to try out the computers, we soon realized that they were very excited to use the computers. We let them play typing tutor games and demonstrated to them where to hold their fingers on the keyboard.

For some of them, it was their first time even touching a computer.

Peace Corps Education Volunteer Robin Al-haddad

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As an education Volunteer in southwestern Uganda, I have the opportunity to work on various secondary projects with local primary schools. In one nearby school, I facilitated a drama club where children could have the opportunity to express themselves, develop self confidence, and develop relationships with others. We also worked to create dramas based on things in their lives that mattered to them. This photo was taken in July 2011, as the children were processing in for their end of term performance. They performed their dramas with great pride that day, and one can see this pride on their faces as they walk in from their school’s front gate.

Peace Corps Education Volunteer Emily Kjesbo-Johnson

As an education Volunteer in southwestern Uganda, I have the opportunity to work on various secondary projects with local primary schools. In one nearby school, I facilitated a drama club where children could have the opportunity to express themselves, develop self confidence, and develop relationships with others. We also worked to create dramas based on things in their lives that mattered to them. This photo was taken in July 2011, as the children were processing in for their end of term performance. They performed their dramas with great pride that day, and one can see this pride on their faces as they walk in from their school’s front gate.

Peace Corps Education Volunteer Emily Kjesbo-Johnson

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Youth Sports Center (Peace Corps Secondary Project)

maybesproutwings:

As many of you know, in addition to teaching English as a Peace Corps Volunteer, I am also involved in youth development work in my community, with a focus on healthy lifestyles. In that vein, my Ukrainian counterparts and I have organized and submitted a grant proposal with the intent of providing the local youth sports center with much needed equipment (from sports equipment to heating units.) Please take a look at the project, and if you’re able to, donate! Even if you’re not personally able to donate to the project, please forward the information to anyone and everyone you think would be interested in being part of this undertaking!

(PS I will be promoting this project endlessly until it’s funded, so be prepared!!)

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Sixteen Peace Corps Volunteers in the Dominican Republic are producing and filming a telenovela (soap opera) entitled, “Me Toca a Mi” (It’s my turn) with more than 25 local youth that will be used in classrooms, educational centers, and youth clubs throughout the country. The telenovela is designed to teach life skills and HIV/AIDS prevention and awareness.

(Source: peacecorps.gov)

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"I was visiting Mongolian friends at Tsgaan Sar, the celebration of the lunar new year. Everyone gets dressed up in their best—and these two boys were no exception. The expressions on their faces are so clear—confidence on the face of the boy on the left and uncertainty and timidness on the face of the little boy on the right."

- Peace Corps Business Development Volunteer Judy Gates

"I was visiting Mongolian friends at Tsgaan Sar, the celebration of the lunar new year. Everyone gets dressed up in their best—and these two boys were no exception. The expressions on their faces are so clear—confidence on the face of the boy on the left and uncertainty and timidness on the face of the little boy on the right."

- Peace Corps Business Development Volunteer Judy Gates

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I had just gotten back home to site from being in the city for two weeks of intensive in-service training. I was nervous about returning to site, returning to my normal routine, the seclusion, the intense cultural differences that make living in a village and city so vastly different. The small children always seem to add color and excitement to life. Upon arriving back home from school, there was a group waiting anxiously for me to come back, it was one of the best feelings. I have never had so much fun playing “Go Fish”, a new game for them. They made the transition much easier.

- Peace Corps Education Volunteer Elle Chang, Indonesia

I had just gotten back home to site from being in the city for two weeks of intensive in-service training. I was nervous about returning to site, returning to my normal routine, the seclusion, the intense cultural differences that make living in a village and city so vastly different. The small children always seem to add color and excitement to life. Upon arriving back home from school, there was a group waiting anxiously for me to come back, it was one of the best feelings. I have never had so much fun playing “Go Fish”, a new game for them. They made the transition much easier.

- Peace Corps Education Volunteer Elle Chang, Indonesia

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